Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/3163
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dc.contributor.authorKotzab, Herbert-
dc.contributor.authorTeller, Christoph-
dc.contributor.authorGrant, David B-
dc.contributor.authorSparks, Leigh-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-05T01:57:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/3163-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model that includes drivers of supply chain management (SCM) adoption and execution identified in the literature, provide a set of measurement scales that operationalise constructs within this model, empirically verify a hierarchical order of antecedents that affects the adoption and execution of SCM, and assist management by providing a focus on those SCM conditions and processes that need to be prioritised to increase successful SCM adoption and execution. Design: The conceptual model is tested empirically through a survey of 174 senior supply chain managers representing the biggest organisations within a central European country. Findings: Using structural equation modelling the hypothesised hierarchical order of three proposed antecedents are verified: ‘internal SCM conditions’ that affect ‘joint or external SCM conditions’ which in turn influences collaborative ‘SCM-related processes’. Firms that adopt these steps should enjoy a rigorous and appropriate road to the full execution of SCM. Research limitations: The survey results reflect the views of large organisations in a country-specific supply chain setting. Practical implications: The findings provide a hierarchical focus for financial, personnel and management initiatives to increase integration within a supply chain and improve competitiveness. Originality/value: The major contribution of this paper is that it provides empirical proof of the antecedents that affect the adoption and execution of SCM.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherEmerald-
dc.relationKotzab H, Teller C, Grant DB & Sparks L (2011) Antecedents for the Adoption and Execution of Supply Chain Management, Supply Chain Management, 16 (4), pp. 231-245.-
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.-
dc.subjectSupply Chain Managementen_UK
dc.subjectIntegrationen_UK
dc.subject.lcshConsumption (Economics)-
dc.subject.lcshDelivery of goods Management-
dc.subject.lcshBusiness logistics Cost effectiveness-
dc.titleAntecedents for the Adoption and Execution of Supply Chain Managementen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/13598541111139053-
dc.citation.jtitleSupply Chain Management-
dc.citation.issn1359-8546-
dc.citation.volume16-
dc.citation.issue4-
dc.citation.spage231-
dc.citation.epage245-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1917120-
dc.author.emailchristoph.teller@stir.ac.uk-
dc.contributor.affiliationCopenhagen Business School-
dc.contributor.affiliationMarketing and Retail Division-
dc.contributor.affiliationHeriot-Watt University-
dc.contributor.affiliationMarketing and Retail Division-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
dc.identifier.isi000293489200003-
Appears in Collections:Marketing and Retail Journal Articles

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