Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31472
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: "The Group Knobe Effect": evidence that people intuitively attribute agency and responsibility to groups
Author(s): Michael, John
Szigeti, András
Keywords: collective responsibility
collective agency
Knobe Effect
blame
praise
collective intentions
Issue Date: 2019
Citation: Michael J & Szigeti A (2019) "The Group Knobe Effect": evidence that people intuitively attribute agency and responsibility to groups. Philosophical Explorations, 22 (1), pp. 44-61. https://doi.org/10.1080/13869795.2018.1492007
Abstract: In the current paper, we present and discuss a series of experiments in which we investigated people’s willingness to ascribe intentions, as well as blame and praise, to groups. The experiments draw upon the so-called “Knobe Effect”. Knobe [2003. “Intentional action and side effects in ordinary language.” Analysis 63: 190–194] found that the positiveness or negativeness of side-effects of actions influences people’s assessment of whether those side-effects were brought about intentionally, and also that people are more willing to assign blame for negative side-effects of actions than they are to assign praise for positive side-effect of actions. Building upon this research, we found evidence that the positiveness or negativeness of side-effects of group actions influences people’s willingness to attribute intentions to groups (Experiment 1a), and that people are more willing to assign blame to groups for negative side-effects of actions than they are to assign praise to groups for positive side-effects of actions (Experiment 1b). We also found evidence (Experiments 2a, 2b, 3 and 4) that the “Group Knobe Effect” persists even when intentions and blame/praise are attributed to groups non-distributively, indicating that people tend not to think of group intentions and group blame/praise in distributive terms. We conclude that the folk are collectivist about group intentions, and also about the blameworthiness and praiseworthiness of groups.
DOI Link: 10.1080/13869795.2018.1492007
Rights: © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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