Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/29523
Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Choreographing a System: Skills and Employability in Software Work
Author(s): Marks, Abigail
Scholarios, Dora
Contact Email: abigail.marks@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: employability
knowledge work
social competencies
software employment
technical skill
Issue Date: 1-Feb-2008
Citation: Marks A & Scholarios D (2008) Choreographing a System: Skills and Employability in Software Work. Economic and Industrial Democracy, 29 (1), pp. 96-124. https://doi.org/10.1177/0143831X07085141
Abstract: While software developers are typically associated with high-status, technical knowledge work, there is evidence of changing skills requirements within the industry. One notable feature is the increasing importance of social competencies, as well as technical skill, which have been proposed as a feature of many new economy occupations. This article examines how this change in skills in software work impacts on employability in the sector. Developers, managers and HR practitioners in four Scottish software organizations provide the empirical focus.
DOI Link: 10.1177/0143831X07085141
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