Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7705
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dc.contributor.authorLeaver, Michaelen_UK
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Stephenen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-30T13:43:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-30T13:43:28Zen_UK
dc.date.issued1996-06en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/7705-
dc.description.abstractThe cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) catalyse the transfer of glutathione to a variety of xenobiotic and toxic endogenous compounds. This results in detoxification of the offending chemical, and the resulting conjugate is able to enter the organism's excretion pathways. The major GST of plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) liver, GSTA, is structurally related to mammalian theta class GSTs and also to GSTs from plants and insects. GST genes are known to be induced in animals and plants by a wide range of xenobiotic chemicals and by oxidative stress, and our interest is in the regulation of GST genes from plaice. Screening of a plaice genomic DNA library with GSTA cDNA resulted in the isolation of two overlapping clones. Analysis of these clones revealed the presence of the gene for GSTA, designated GSTA, and also two more putative genes for closely related GSTs, designated GSTA1 and GSTA2. The exon structures of the three GST genes are very similar and the predicted amino acid sequences show 60-70% homology. Promoter analysis of the regions upstream of GSTA and GSTA1 were shown to have activity in a turbot fibroblast cell line, but the region upstream of GSTA2 was inactive in this system. The promoter active regions of GSTA contain sequence elements which have been shown to respond to oxidative stress in mammals, and the regions upstream of GSTA1 contain oestrogen and peroxisomal proliferator response elements. Thus we have shown that these two closely related genes are physically close together in the plaice genome but we believe them to be under separate control and to respond to different signals and stressors.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherElsevieren_UK
dc.relationLeaver M & George S (1996) Three repeated glutathione S-transferase genes from a marine fish, the plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), Marine Environmental Research, 42 (1-4), pp. 19-23. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0141113695000801; https://doi.org/10.1016/0141-1136%2895%2900080-1.en_UK
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.en_UK
dc.titleThree repeated glutathione S-transferase genes from a marine fish, the plaice (Pleuronectes platessa)en_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2995-07-01en_UK
dc.rights.embargoreason[1-s2.0-0141113695000801-main.pdf] : The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0141-1136(95)00080-1en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleMarine Environmental Researchen_UK
dc.citation.issn0141-1136en_UK
dc.citation.volume42en_UK
dc.citation.issue1-4en_UK
dc.citation.spage19en_UK
dc.citation.epage23en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0141113695000801en_UK
dc.author.emailm.j.leaver@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date02/11/2000en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute of Aquacultureen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute of Aquacultureen_UK
dc.identifier.isiA1996UU36900005en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-0029979959en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid791678en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-3155-0844en_UK
dc.date.firstcompliantdepositdate2012-08-29en_UK
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles

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