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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7550

Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The effect of colour vision status on the detection and selection of fruits by tamarins (Saguinus spp.)
Author(s): Smith, Andrew C
Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M
Surridge, Alison K
Osorio, Daniel
Mundy, Nicholas
Contact Email: h.m.buchanan-smith@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: polymorphic colour vision
trichromacy
dichromacy
sex differences
individual differences
tamarin
Saguinus
Issue Date: Sep-2003
Publisher: The Company of Biologists
Citation: Smith AC, Buchanan-Smith HM, Surridge AK, Osorio D & Mundy N (2003) The effect of colour vision status on the detection and selection of fruits by tamarins (Saguinus spp.), Journal of Experimental Biology, 206 (18), pp. 3159-3165.
Abstract: The evolution of trichromatic colour vision by the majority of anthropoid primates has been linked to the efficient detection and selection of food, particularly ripe fruits among leaves in dappled light. Modelling of visual signals has shown that trichromats should be more efficient than dichromats at distinguishing both fruits from leaves and ripe from unripe fruits. This prediction is tested in a controlled captive setting using stimuli recreated from those actually encountered by wild tamarins (Saguinus spp.). Dietary data and reflectance spectra of Abuta fluminum fruits eaten by wild saddleback (Saguinus fuscicollis) and moustached (Saguinus mystax) tamarins and their associated leaves were collected in Peru. A. fluminum leaves, and fruits in three stages of ripeness, were reproduced and presented to captive saddleback and red-bellied tamarins (Saguinus labiatus). Trichromats were quicker to learn the task and were more efficient at selecting ripe fruits than were dichromats. This is the first time that a trichromatic foraging advantage has been demonstrated for monkeys using naturalistic stimuli with the same chromatic properties as those encountered by wild animals.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7550
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.00536
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Stirling
Psychology
University of East Anglia
University of Sussex
University of Cambridge

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