Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/34530
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Small-angle attraction in the tilt illusion
Author(s): Akgöz, Ayşe
Gheorghiu, Elena
Kingdom, Frederick
Contact Email: elena.gheorghiu@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: tilt illusion
surround induction
texture
assimilation
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2022
Date Deposited: 25-Jul-2022
Citation: Akgöz A, Gheorghiu E & Kingdom F (2022) Small-angle attraction in the tilt illusion. Journal of Vision, 22 (8), Art. No.: 16. https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.22.8.16; https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.22.8.16
Abstract: The tilt illusion (TI) describes the phenomenon in which a surround inducer grating of a particular orientation influences the perceived orientation of a central test grating. Typically, inducer-test orientation differences of 5-40 deg cause the test orientation to appear shifted away from the inducer orientation, i.e. showing repulsion. For orientation differences of 60-90 deg, the inducer typically causes the test grating orientation to appear shifted towards the inducer orientation, termed here “large-angle” attraction. Both repulsion and large-angle attraction effects have been observed in contrast-modulated as well as luminance-modulated grating patterns. Here we show that a secondary, “small-angle” 0-10 deg attraction effect is observed in contrast-modulated and orientation-modulated gratings, as well as in luminance-modulated gratings that are relatively low in spatial frequency, low in contrast or contain added texture. The observed small-angle attraction, which can exceed in magnitude that of the repulsion and large-angle attraction effects, is dependent on the spatial phase relationship between the inducer and test, being maximal when in-phase. Both small-angle attraction and repulsion effects are reduced when a gap is introduced between test and inducer. Our findings suggest that small-angle attraction in the TI is a result of assimilation of the inducer pattern into the receptive fields of the neurons sensitive to the test.
URL: https://doi.org/10.1167/jov.22.8.16
DOI Link: 10.1167/jov.22.8.16
Notes: Output Status: Forthcoming/Available Online
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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