Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/34367
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Impacts of Hurricane Matthew on adjacent developed and undeveloped barrier islands in southeastern North Carolina
Author(s): Backstrom, Joni T
Loureiro, Carlos
Eulie, Devon O
Contact Email: carlos.loureiro@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Storms
Overwash
Coastal erosion
RTK–GPS
Beach profiles
Frontal dunes
NERRS
Issue Date: Jun-2022
Date Deposited: 25-May-2022
Citation: Backstrom JT, Loureiro C & Eulie DO (2022) Impacts of Hurricane Matthew on adjacent developed and undeveloped barrier islands in southeastern North Carolina. Regional Studies in Marine Science, 53, Art. No.: 102391. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2022.102391
Abstract: High-magnitude storms such as hurricanes can cause significant and potentially long-lasting morphological coastal change, particularly along low-lying barrier islands. This study investigated the impacts of Hurricane Matthew (2016) on neighboring undeveloped Masonboro Island reserve and engineered/nourished Wrightsville Beach barrier islands, located in southeast North Carolina. Using a combination of high-resolution pre- and post-storm RTK–GPS beach surveys, coupled with direct observations, storm surge and wave runup calculations and aerial imagery, a range of contrasting storm-induced coastal changes and impact regimes were identified across the two adjacent barriers. Storm impacts were especially pronounced across low-lying undeveloped central/southern Masonboro Island, which was dominated by significant overwash processes, leading to landward directed barrier crest migration. In contrast, only short-lived and minor collision with the dune base was observed at Wrightsville Beach, were storm impacts were dominated by a swash storm regime resulting in significant beach erosion. Field- and aerial based observations match well with modeled extreme water level estimates. This study offers a real-time example of how geomorphologically different neighboring islands respond to specific storm events, and how storm impact regime type and duration helps explain differences in barrier responses. Similar storm impacts are likely at other locations with comparable barrier island settings and differing coastal management approaches.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.rsma.2022.102391
Rights: [Backstrom_etal_2022_PublishedVersion.pdf] The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
[Backstrom_etal_2022_PostPrintAuthorVersion.pdf] This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Backstrom JT, Loureiro C & Eulie DO (2022) Impacts of Hurricane Matthew on adjacent developed and undeveloped barrier islands in southeastern North Carolina. Regional Studies in Marine Science, 53, Art. No.: 102391. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2022.102391 © 2022, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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