Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/32436
Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Where you search determines what you find: the effects of bibliographic databases on systematic reviews
Author(s): Wanyama, Seperia B
McQuaid, Ronald W
Kittler, Markus
Contact Email: ronald.mcquaid@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Systematic literature review
database search
literature review
meta-analysis
Issue Date: 5-Mar-2021
Date Deposited: 15-Mar-2021
Citation: Wanyama SB, McQuaid RW & Kittler M (2021) Where you search determines what you find: the effects of bibliographic databases on systematic reviews. International Journal of Social Research Methodology. https://doi.org/10.1080/13645579.2021.1892378
Abstract: Systematic literature reviews are common in social research for integrating and synthesising existing research. This paper argues that the outcomes of such reviews are affected by the choice of bibliographic databases. It presents evidence of substantial variation across three large electronic databases (Scopus, Web of Science and EBSCO) in a study on employee retention and staff turnover. It considers the specific articles, numbers returned, numbers shared across databases and perceived quality of journals hosting the retrieved articles. Results show that only 130 articles (5.7% of 2267 retrieved) were found common to all three databases, suggesting that decisions on how and where literature is retrieved can substantially affect the results of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The findings caution against the use of single databases and claiming comprehensiveness. The paper reflects on how additional literature search methods (e.g., contacting experts, citation indices) and their sequence of use can affect systematic review quality.
DOI Link: 10.1080/13645579.2021.1892378
Rights: [IJSRM where you search 21.pdf] The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
[IJSRM_Where_you_search_FINAL 150221.pdf] This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is an Accepted Manuscript version of the following article, accepted for publication in International Journal of Social Research Methodology. Seperia B. Wanyama, Ronald W. McQuaid & Markus Kittler (2021) Where you search determines what you find: the effects of bibliographic databases on systematic reviews, International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 10.1080/13645579.2021.1892378. It is deposited under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Notes: Output Status: Forthcoming/Available Online
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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