Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/32298
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dc.contributor.authorGray, Danielen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMontagnoli, Albertoen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMoro, Mirkoen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-20T01:03:54Z-
dc.date.available2021-02-20T01:03:54Z-
dc.date.issued2021-03en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/32298-
dc.description.abstractThis paper uses a range of exogenous schooling reforms in the UK to explore the relationship between education and a range of financial behaviours. Initially, we exploit two compulsory schooling reforms in Britain (1947 and 1972) and employ a regression discontinuity design to analyse nationally representative data. We find limited evidence that one extra year of schooling led to systematically different financial behaviours. One exception is the promotion of more positive saving behaviours amongst females affected by the 1947 reform. We then go on to explore a large expansion of the higher education sector in the UK, which occurred during the 1980s and 1990s, and confirm that general education does not appear to affect financial behaviours systematically. We argue that, despite clear positive spill-overs of educational reforms, desirable financial behaviours require specific and targeted education policies and we point to the growing research in this field to support this conclusion.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherElsevieren_UK
dc.relationGray D, Montagnoli A & Moro M (2021) Does education improve financial behaviors? Quasi-experimental evidence from Britain. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 183, pp. 481-507. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2021.01.002en_UK
dc.rightsThis item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Gray D, Montagnoli A & Moro M (2021) Does education improve financial behaviors? Quasi-experimental evidence from Britain. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 183, pp. 481-507. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2021.01.002 © 2021, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectCompulsory schooling lawsen_UK
dc.subjectEducation expansionen_UK
dc.subjectFinancial behavioursen_UK
dc.subjectRegression discontinuityen_UK
dc.subjectSaving decisionsen_UK
dc.titleDoes education improve financial behaviors? Quasi-experimental evidence from Britainen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2022-07-30en_UK
dc.rights.embargoreason[Education_and_Financial_Behaviours___JEBO_Revisions.pdf] Publisher requires embargo of 18 months after formal publication.en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jebo.2021.01.002en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleJournal of Economic Behavior and Organizationen_UK
dc.citation.issn0167-2681en_UK
dc.citation.volume183en_UK
dc.citation.spage481en_UK
dc.citation.epage507en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusAM - Accepted Manuscripten_UK
dc.author.emailmirko.moro@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date29/01/2021en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Sheffielden_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Sheffielden_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationEconomicsen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000621626200026en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85100047635en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1706933en_UK
dc.date.accepted2021-01-03en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2021-02-19en_UK
Appears in Collections:Economics Journal Articles

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