Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/32269
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Beta diversity of stream insects differs between boreal and subtropical regions, but land use does not generally cause biotic homogenization
Author(s): Petsch, Danielle K
Saito, Victor S
Landeiro, Victor L
Silva, Thiago S F
Bini, Luis M
Heino, Jani
Soininen, Janne
Tolonen, Kimmo T
Jyrkänkallio-Mikkola, Jenny
Pajunen, Virpi
Siqueira, Tadeu
Melo, Adriano S
Contact Email: thiago.sf.silva@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: aquatic insects
functional homogenization
latitudinal diversity gradient
biological traits
environmental heterogeneity
Issue Date: Mar-2021
Date Deposited: 11-Feb-2021
Citation: Petsch DK, Saito VS, Landeiro VL, Silva TSF, Bini LM, Heino J, Soininen J, Tolonen KT, Jyrkänkallio-Mikkola J, Pajunen V, Siqueira T & Melo AS (2021) Beta diversity of stream insects differs between boreal and subtropical regions, but land use does not generally cause biotic homogenization. Freshwater Science, 40 (1), pp. 53-64. https://doi.org/10.1086/712565
Abstract: Previous studies have found mixed results regarding the relationship between beta diversity and latitude. In addition, by influencing local environmental heterogeneity, land use may modify spatial taxonomic and functional variability among communities causing biotic differentiation or homogenization. We tested 1) whether taxonomic and functional beta diversities among streams within watersheds differ between subtropical and boreal regions and 2) whether land use is related to taxonomic and functional beta diversities in both regions. We sampled aquatic insects in 100 subtropical (Brazil) and 100 boreal (Finland) streams across a wide gradient of land use, including agriculture and exotic planted, secondary, and native forests. We calculated beta diversity at the watershed scale (among 5 streams in each watershed). We found higher taxonomic beta diversity among subtropical than among boreal streams, whereas functional beta diversity was similar between the 2 regions. Total land use was positively correlated with taxonomic and functional beta diversity among subtropical streams, while local environmental heterogeneity was positively correlated with beta diversity among boreal streams. We suggest that different types and intensities of land use may increase among-stream heterogeneity, promoting distinct insect assemblage compositions among streams. Our findings also suggest that beta diversity patterns and their underlying determinants are highly context dependent.
DOI Link: 10.1086/712565
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. © 2020 by The Society for Freshwater Science. Petsch DK, Saito VS, Landeiro VL, Silva TSF, Bini LM, Heino J, Soininen J, Tolonen KT, Jyrkänkallio-Mikkola J, Pajunen V, Siqueira T & Melo AS (2021) Beta diversity of stream insects differs between boreal and subtropical regions, but land use does not generally cause biotic homogenization. Freshwater Science, 40 (1), pp. 53-64. https://doi.org/10.1086/712565
Licence URL(s): https://storre.stir.ac.uk/STORREEndUserLicence.pdf

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Ms_Petsch_etal_FS_rev2_TE2_v2a.pdfFulltext - Accepted Version384.03 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 2021-12-05    Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependent on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.



This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.