Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/32184
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Effect of "finite pool of worry" and COVID-19 on UK climate change perceptions
Author(s): Evensen, Darrick
Whitmarsh, Lorraine
Bartie, Phil
Devine-Wright, Patrick
Dickie, Jennifer
Varley, Adam
Ryder, Stacia
Mayer, Adam
Keywords: climate change
finite pool of worry
COVID-19
longitudinal
United Kingdom
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2021
Date Deposited: 18-Jan-2021
Citation: Evensen D, Whitmarsh L, Bartie P, Devine-Wright P, Dickie J, Varley A, Ryder S & Mayer A (2021) Effect of "finite pool of worry" and COVID-19 on UK climate change perceptions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118 (3), Art. No.: e2018936118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2018936118
Abstract: Research reveals that a “finite pool of worry” constrains concern about and action on climate change. Nevertheless, a longitudinal panel survey of 1,858 UK residents, surveyed in April 2019 and June 2020, reveals little evidence for diminishing climate change concern during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, the sample identifies climate change as a bigger threat than COVID-19. The findings suggest climate change has become an intransigent concern within UK public consciousness.
DOI Link: 10.1073/pnas.2018936118
Rights: Copyright © 2021 the Author(s). Published by PNAS. This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC BY - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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