Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31818
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Moving on or deciding to let go? A pathway exploring the relationship between emotional and decisional forgiveness and intentional forgetting
Author(s): Noreen, Saima
MacLeod, Malcolm D
Keywords: Construal level
Directed forgetting
Executive control
Forgiveness
Psychological distance
Issue Date: 3-Sep-2020
Citation: Noreen S & MacLeod MD (2020) Moving on or deciding to let go? A pathway exploring the relationship between emotional and decisional forgiveness and intentional forgetting. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000948
Abstract: We report 3 empirical studies that represent the first systematic attempt to explore the relationship between emotional and decisional forgiveness and intentional forgetting. On this basis, we propose a model that provides a credible explanation for the relationship between forgiveness and forgetting. Specifically, we propose that engaging in emotional forgiveness promotes the psychological distancing of an offense, such that victims construe the offense at a higher and more abstract level. This high-level construal, in turn, promotes larger intentional forgetting effects, which, in turn, promote increased emotional forgiveness. Our studies found that participants in an emotional forgiveness manipulation reported increased psychological distance and recalled more high-level construals than did participants in either a decisional or no-forgiveness manipulation (Study 1). Using the list-method directed forgetting paradigm, we found that participants in an emotional forgiveness manipulation showed larger forgetting effects for both offense-relevant and -irrelevant information using both hypothetical (Study 2) and real-life (Study 3) moral transgressions compared with participants in either decisional or no-forgiveness manipulations. The potential implications of these findings for coping with unpleasant episodes in our lives are considered.
DOI Link: 10.1037/xlm0000948
Rights: ¬©American Psychological Association, 2020. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000948
Notes: Output Status: Forthcoming/Available Online

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