Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31634
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: A Multisensory Perspective on the Role of the Amygdala in Body Ownership
Author(s): Reader, Arran T
Crucianelli, Laura
Issue Date: 25-Sep-2019
Citation: Reader AT & Crucianelli L (2019) A Multisensory Perspective on the Role of the Amygdala in Body Ownership. Journal of Neuroscience, 39 (39), pp. 7645-7647. https://doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.0971-19.2019
Abstract: A sense of ownership over one's own body is essential for effective interaction with the world: acting upon objects or communicating with others relies on distinguishing between the parts of the world that constitute our self, and the parts of the world that do not. The sense of body ownership is frequently associated with activity in the ventral premotor cortex, intraparietal sulcus, and insula (Grivaz et al., 2017), and is believed to stem from multisensory integration (Ehrsson, 2012): congruent sensory signals are combined to provide a feeling of bodily self that is distinct from the surrounding environment. This is emphasized by the rubber hand illusion (RHI), in which synchronous, but not asynchronous, stroking of a rubber hand and the real hand (which is hidden from view) can induce a sense of ownership over the false limb (Botvinick and Cohen, 1998).
DOI Link: 10.1523/jneurosci.0971-19.2019
Rights: This work is available to the public to copy, distribute, or display under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). This license allows data and text mining, use of figures in presentations, and posting the article online, provided that the original article is credited.
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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