Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31512
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dc.contributor.authorSimo, Franklinen_UK
dc.contributor.authorDifouo Fopa, Ghislainen_UK
dc.contributor.authorKekeunou, Seviloren_UK
dc.contributor.authorIchu, Ichu Gen_UK
dc.contributor.authorEsong Ebong, Lionelen_UK
dc.contributor.authorOlson, Daviden_UK
dc.contributor.authorIngram, Daniel Jen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-05T00:01:35Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-05T00:01:35Z-
dc.date.issued2020-12en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/31512-
dc.description.abstractFirst paragraph: Pangolins (Order: Pholidota) remain one of the most challenging groups of mammals to detect and study. Yet, locating and documenting pangolin presence is essential to provide data on their distribution and population, which help to build effective conservation strategies. Pangolins are considered to be elusive and many of their ecological traits, such as low population density, largely nocturnal and solitary lifestyle, and use of burrows and cavities make it difficult to gather relevant information from commonly used monitoring approaches that are effective for other mammals (Ingram, Willcox, & Challender, 2019; Nash, Wong, & Turvey, 2016; Willcox et al., 2019). The white-bellied pangolin, Phataginus tricuspis, is a semi-arboreal species that feeds exclusively on ants and termites (Akpona, Djagoun, & Sinsin, 2008; Kingdon et al., 2013). They typically inhabit dense forest though also occur in forest–savannah–crop mosaics at times(Pietersen et al., 2019). The ecology of this species is poorly known due in part, to the challenges of studying pangolins and a lack of standardised research methods. (Willcox et al., 2019). Here, we evaluate the utility of local ecological knowledge (LEK) in tailoring camera-trap surveys, a detection method increasingly used for pangolins, to improve detection efficiency for occurrence and ecological studies for the white-bellied pangolin.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherWileyen_UK
dc.relationSimo F, Difouo Fopa G, Kekeunou S, Ichu IG, Esong Ebong L, Olson D & Ingram DJ (2020) Using local ecological knowledge to improve the effectiveness of detecting white-bellied pangolins (Phataginus tricuspis) using camera traps: A case study from Deng-Deng National Park, Cameroon. African Journal of Ecology, 58 (4), pp. 879-884. https://doi.org/10.1111/aje.12762en_UK
dc.rightsThis item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Simo, F, Difouo Fopa, G, Kekeunou, S, et al. Using local ecological knowledge to improve the effectiveness of detecting white‐bellied pangolins (Phataginus tricuspis) using camera traps: A case study from Deng‐Deng National Park, Cameroon. African Journal of Ecology 2020; 58: 879– 884, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/aje.12762. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.en_UK
dc.rights.urihttps://storre.stir.ac.uk/STORREEndUserLicence.pdfen_UK
dc.titleUsing local ecological knowledge to improve the effectiveness of detecting white-bellied pangolins (Phataginus tricuspis) using camera traps: A case study from Deng-Deng National Park, Cameroonen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2021-06-30en_UK
dc.rights.embargoreason[Author Accepted Version - Simo et al.pdf] Publisher requires embargo of 12 months after formal publication.en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aje.12762en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleAfrican Journal of Ecologyen_UK
dc.citation.issn1365-2028en_UK
dc.citation.issn0141-6707en_UK
dc.citation.volume58en_UK
dc.citation.issue4en_UK
dc.citation.spage879en_UK
dc.citation.epage884en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusAM - Accepted Manuscripten_UK
dc.author.emaildaniel.ingram@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date29/06/2020en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Yaounde Ien_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Yaounde Ien_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Yaounde Ien_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Yaounde Ien_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Buea, Cameroonen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationWorld Wildlife Fund for Nature (WWF)en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000543775900001en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85087170103en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1645735en_UK
dc.date.accepted2020-05-31en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2020-08-04en_UK
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles

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