Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31471
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Prosocial effects of coordination - What, how and why?
Author(s): Michael, John
McEllin, Luke
Felber, Annalena
Keywords: Coordination
Synchronization
Prosociality
Trust
Commitment
Cooperation
Issue Date: Jun-2020
Citation: Michael J, McEllin L & Felber A (2020) Prosocial effects of coordination - What, how and why?. Acta Psychologica, 207, Art. No.: 103083. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2020.103083
Abstract: A wealth of research in recent decades has investigated the effects of various forms of coordination upon prosocial attitudes and behavior. To structure and constrain this research, we provide a framework within which to distinguish and interrelate different hypotheses about the psychological mechanisms underpinning various prosocial effects of various forms of coordination. To this end, we introduce a set of definitions and distinctions that can be used to tease apart various forms of prosociality and coordination. We then identify a range of psychological mechanisms that may underpin the effects of coordination upon prosociality. We show that different hypotheses about the underlying psychological mechanisms motivate different predictions about the effects of various forms of coordination in different circumstances.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2020.103083
Rights: This article is available under the Creative Commons CC-BY-NC-ND license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) and permits non-commercial use of the work as published, without adaptation or alteration provided the work is fully attributed. For commercial reuse, permission must be requested
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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