Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31470
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Joint action goals reduce visuomotor interference effects from a partner’s incongruent actions
Author(s): Clarke, Sam
McEllin, Luke
Francová, Anna
Székely, Marcell
Butterfill, Stephen A.
Michael, John
Keywords: Human behaviour
Motor control
Issue Date: Dec-2019
Citation: Clarke S, McEllin L, Francová A, Székely M, Butterfill SA & Michael J (2019) Joint action goals reduce visuomotor interference effects from a partner’s incongruent actions. Scientific Reports, 9 (1), Art. No.: 15414. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-52124-6
Abstract: Joint actions often require agents to track others’ actions while planning and executing physically incongruent actions of their own. Previous research has indicated that this can lead to visuomotor interference effects when it occurs outside of joint action. How is this avoided or overcome in joint actions? We hypothesized that when joint action partners represent their actions as interrelated components of a plan to bring about a joint action goal, each partner’s movements need not be represented in relation to distinct, incongruent proximal goals. Instead they can be represented in relation to a single proximal goal – especially if the movements are, or appear to be, mechanically linked to a more distal joint action goal. To test this, we implemented a paradigm in which participants produced finger movements that were either congruent or incongruent with those of a virtual partner, and either with or without a joint action goal (the joint flipping of a switch, which turned on two light bulbs). Our findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that visuomotor interference effects can be reduced when two physically incongruent actions are represented as mechanically interdependent contributions to a joint action goal.
DOI Link: 10.1038/s41598-019-52124-6
Rights: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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