Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30898
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Understanding genetic diversity of relict forests. Linking long-term isolation legacies and current habitat fragmentation in Abies pinsapo Boiss
Author(s): Cobo-Simón, Irene
Méndez-Cea, Belén
Jump, Alistair
Seco, José
Gallego, Francisco
Linares, Juan Carlos
Contact Email: a.s.jump@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Land-use legacy
Adaptive management
Circum-mediterranean firs
Conservation genetics
Microsatellite marker
Genetic diversity
Genetic differentiation
Population genetics
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2020
Citation: Cobo-Simón I, Méndez-Cea B, Jump A, Seco J, Gallego F & Linares JC (2020) Understanding genetic diversity of relict forests. Linking long-term isolation legacies and current habitat fragmentation in Abies pinsapo Boiss. Forest Ecology and Management, 461, Art. No.: 117947. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2020.117947
Abstract: Increasing variability and uncertainty regarding future climate provide new challenges for the conservation of endangered tree species. For example, threat status can be impacted by genetic diversity, where forest trees show reduced geographic range size, isolated populations and fragmented distribution. We place the conservation insights of population genetic structure in a climate change context, using as experimental system a relict drought-sensitive fir (Abies pinsapo Boiss.). Nuclear (nSSR, ISSR) and chloroplast (cpSSR) markers were analysed to investigate the extent to that A. pinsapo evidences ongoing genetic erosion, isolation and divergent genetic diversity, among populations, elevations and cohorts (young, adult and old trees). We obtained contrasting patterns among chloroplast and nuclear markers. Based on cpSSRs, the highest genetic distances were found in the western portion of the distribution, while based on both nSSRs and ISSRs, differentiation appeared in the eastern portion of the distribution. Evidence for bottlenecks and genetic drift were found in all the studied populations, as well as low among-population genetic differentiation. Land use legacies e.g. impacting current forest structural diversity might be related to observed genetic diversity. No evidence of demographic genetic erosion among cohorts was found. Conservation efforts should focus on reducing the probability of occurrence of stochastic events such as fires and habitat loss due to human impacts or climate change to maximise A. pinsapo population sizes. Further research on adaptive potential should focus on identifying active genetic management strategies that might improve adaptation to future climates in such endangered relict species.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.foreco.2020.117947
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Cobo-Simón I, Méndez-Cea B, Jump A, Seco J, Gallego F & Linares JC (2020) Understanding genetic diversity of relict forests. Linking long-term isolation legacies and current habitat fragmentation in Abies pinsapo Boiss. Forest Ecology and Management, 461, Art. No.: 117947. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2020.117947 © 2020, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
FORECO_2019_2005_REVISED.pdfFulltext - Accepted Version1.01 MBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 2021-02-08    Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependent on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.



This item is protected by original copyright



A file in this item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.