Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30814
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Exploring the relationship between stress coping styles and sex, origin and reproductive success, in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) breeders in captivity
Author(s): Ibarra-Zatarain, Zohar
Martín, Ignacio
Rasines, Immaculada
Fatsini, Elvira
Rey, Sonia
Chereguini, Olvido
Duncan, Neil
Contact Email: sonia.reyplanellas@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Solea senegalensis
coping styles
fitness
reproduction
sex differences
Issue Date: 1-Jun-2020
Citation: Ibarra-Zatarain Z, Martín I, Rasines I, Fatsini E, Rey S, Chereguini O & Duncan N (2020) Exploring the relationship between stress coping styles and sex, origin and reproductive success, in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) breeders in captivity. Physiology and Behavior, 220, Art. No.: 112868. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2020.112868
Abstract: Individual animals commonly adopt different stress coping styles that have been shown to impact reproductive success and differ between sexes (female/male) and origin (wild/hatchery). Hatchery reared Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) exhibit a behavioural reproductive dysfunction and a complete failure to spawn viable eggs. Hence, the present study examined whether 1) reproductive success of Senegalese sole was linked to coping styles and 2) behavioural differences exist in relation to sex or origin. A total of 198 breeders held in two research institutions were submitted to three individual tests (restraining, new environment and confinement) and one grouping test (risk taking). In addition, a blood sample to quantify cortisol, glucose and lactate levels was obtained from each individual after completing the individual tests. Senegalese sole breeders showed individual differences in behaviour across the different behavioural tests that were consistent with proactive and reactive coping styles traits. However, the most striking result was that reproductive success, sex and origin of Senegalese sole was not biased to any specific coping style. Indeed, the behavioural responses were similar and consistent between fish grouped by reproductive success, sex and origin. This study presented information that contrasts with different studies on dominant aggressive species and indicated that social non-aggressive species such as Senegalese sole follow a cooperative strategy that favours equal opportunities between stress coping styles and sexes. Therefore, results suggest that maintaining both coping styles strategies are fundamental for a sustainable breeder population approach.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2020.112868
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Z. Ibarra-Zatarain, I. Martı , I. Rasine , E. Fatsini, S. Rey, O. Chereguini, N. Duncan, Exploring the relationship between stress coping styles and sex, origin and reproductive success, in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) breeders in captivity, Physiology & Behavior (2020), 220, Art. No.: 112868, doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2020.112868 © 2020, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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