Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30633
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Understanding, attitudes and dehumanisation towards autistic people
Author(s): Cage, Eilidh
Di Monaco, Jessica
Newell, Victoria
Contact Email: eilidh.cage@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: attitudes
autism spectrum conditions
autism understanding
dehumanisation
Issue Date: Aug-2019
Citation: Cage E, Di Monaco J & Newell V (2019) Understanding, attitudes and dehumanisation towards autistic people. Autism, 23 (6), pp. 1373-1383. https://doi.org/10.1177/1362361318811290
Abstract: Research suggests that while individuals may self-report positive attitudes towards autism, dehumanising attitudes (seeing another as less than human) may still prevail. This study investigated knowledge, openness and dehumanising attitudes of non-autistic people towards autistic people. A total of 361 participants completed a survey measuring autism openness, knowledge and experience, along with a measure of dehumanisation. Results showed that knowledge of autism was comparable to past research and females were more open towards autism. Findings also indicated evidence for dehumanisation, with a particular denial of ‘human uniqueness’ traits. Furthermore, dehumanisation was related to openness towards autism. These findings have implications for targeting attitudes to reduce stigma associated with autism.
DOI Link: 10.1177/1362361318811290
Rights: Cage E, Di Monaco J & Newell V, Understanding, attitudes and dehumanisation towards autistic people, Autism 23(6) pp. 1373-1383. Copyright © The Authors 2018. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1362361318811290
Licence URL(s): https://storre.stir.ac.uk/STORREEndUserLicence.pdf

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