Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30475
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Can Communicating Personalised Disease Risk Promote Healthy Behaviour Change? A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews
Author(s): French, David P
Cameron, Elaine
Benton, Jack S
Deaton, Christi
Harvie, Michelle
Keywords: Systematic review
Risk communication
Behaviour change
Behaviour
Issue Date: Oct-2017
Citation: French DP, Cameron E, Benton JS, Deaton C & Harvie M (2017) Can Communicating Personalised Disease Risk Promote Healthy Behaviour Change? A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 51 (5), pp. 718-729. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-017-9895-z
Abstract: Background The assessment and communication of disease risk that is personalised to the individual is widespread in healthcare contexts. Despite several systematic reviews of RCTs, it is unclear under what circumstances that personalised risk estimates promotes change in four key health-related behaviours: smoking, physical activity, diet and alcohol consumption. Purpose The present research aims to systematically identify, evaluate and synthesise the findings of existing systematic reviews. Methods This systematic review of systematic reviews followed published guidance. A search of four databases and two-stage screening procedure with good reliability identified nine eligible systematic reviews. Results The nine reviews each included between three and 15 primary studies, containing 36 unique studies. Methods of personalising risk feedback included imaging/visual feedback, genetic testing, and numerical estimation from risk algorithms. The reviews were generally high quality. For a broad range of methods of estimating and communicating risk, the reviews found no evidence that risk information had strong or consistent effects on health-related behaviours. The most promising effects came from interventions using visual or imaging techniques and with smoking cessation and dietary behaviour as outcomes, but with inconsistent results. Few interventions explicitly used theory, few targeted self-efficacy or response efficacy, and a limited range of Behaviour Change Techniques were used. Conclusions Presenting risk information on its own, even when highly personalised, does not produce strong effects on health-related behaviours or changes which are sustained. Future research in this area should build on the existing knowledge base about increasing the effects of risk communication on behaviour.
DOI Link: 10.1007/s12160-017-9895-z
Rights: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons At tribution 4.0 International License (http:/ / creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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