Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30439
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Differentiation in prefrontal cortex recruitment during childhood: Evidence from cognitive control demands and social contexts
Author(s): Chevalier, Nicolas
Jackson, Judith
Revueltas Roux, Alexia
Moriguchi, Yusuke
Auyeung, Bonnie
Keywords: Prefrontal cortex
Cognitive control
Cooperation
Competition
Children
Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)
Issue Date: Apr-2019
Citation: Chevalier N, Jackson J, Revueltas Roux A, Moriguchi Y & Auyeung B (2019) Differentiation in prefrontal cortex recruitment during childhood: Evidence from cognitive control demands and social contexts. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 36, Art. No.: 100629. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2019.100629
Abstract: Emerging cognitive control during childhood is largely supported by the development of distributed neural networks in which the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is central. The present study used fNIRS to examine how PFC is recruited to support cognitive control in 5–6 and 8-9-year-old children, by (a) progressively increasing cognitive control demands within the same task, and (b) manipulating the social context in which the task was performed (neutral, cooperative, or competitive), a factor that has been shown to influence cognitive control. Activation increased more in left than right PFC with cognitive control demands, a pattern which was more pronounced in older than younger children. In addition, activation was higher in left PFC in competitive than cooperative contexts, and higher in right PFC in cooperative and neutral than competitive contexts. These findings suggest that increasingly efficient cognitive control during childhood is supported by more differentiated recruitment of PFC as a function of cognitive control demands with age.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.dcn.2019.100629
Rights: This article is available under the Creative Commons CC-BY-NC-ND license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) and permits non-commercial use of the work as published, without adaptation or alteration provided the work is fully attributed.
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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