Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30406
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Towards solving a scientific controversy - The effects of ionising radiation on the environment
Author(s): Beresford, Nicola A
Horemans, Nele
Copplestone, David
Raines, Katherine E
Orizaola, German
Wood, Mike D
Laanen, Paulus
Whitehead, Helen C
Burrows, Jessica E
Tinsley, Matthew C
Smith, James T
Bonzom, Jean-Marc
Gagnaire, Beatrice
Adam-Guillermin, Christelle
Gashchak, Sergiy
Contact Email: david.copplestone@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Jan-2020
Citation: Beresford NA, Horemans N, Copplestone D, Raines KE, Orizaola G, Wood MD, Laanen P, Whitehead HC, Burrows JE, Tinsley MC, Smith JT, Bonzom J, Gagnaire B, Adam-Guillermin C & Gashchak S (2020) Towards solving a scientific controversy - The effects of ionising radiation on the environment. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 211, Art. No.: 106033. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvrad.2019.106033
Abstract: First paragraph: Human use of radioactivity is increasing in fields such as nuclear power generation and nuclear medicine. Nuclear power continues to be a part of many countries’ energy portfolios and may increase dramatically in some Asian countries and Russia, with up to 300 new reactors are currently proposed; other countries without existing nuclear power programmes are beginning to develop them (e.g. some African nations and Persian Gulf states). Worldwide there are c.450 operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) and 60 under construction (World Nuclear Association, 2019). The continued use of nuclear power is considered, by some, as essential in the transition to low-carbon economies (e.g. Liu et al., 2013; Gibon et al., 2017). At the same time, many nations face having to develop long-term strategies, and consequent infrastructure, to manage high-level radioactive waste (as arising from nuclear power production); other nations are challenged with legacy issues associated with, for instance, large-scale accidental releases or past and on-going uranium mining/processing industries.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.jenvrad.2019.106033
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Beresford NA, Horemans N, Copplestone D, Raines KE, Orizaola G, Wood MD, Laanen P, Whitehead HC, Burrows JE, Tinsley MC, Smith JT, Bonzom J, Gagnaire B, Adam-Guillermin C & Gashchak S (2020) Towards solving a scientific controversy - The effects of ionising radiation on the environment. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 211, Art. No.: 106033. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvrad.2019.106033 © 2019, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Notes: Additional co-authors: AN Jha, A de Menezes, N Willey, D Spurgeon
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Beresford et al. (Statement 2019 final JER).pdfFulltext - Accepted Version922.4 kBAdobe PDFView/Open



This item is protected by original copyright



A file in this item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.