Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30269
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dc.contributor.authorCovic, Amraen_UK
dc.contributor.authorKeitel, Christianen_UK
dc.contributor.authorPorcu, Emanueleen_UK
dc.contributor.authorSchröger, Erichen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Matthias Men_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-09T00:03:24Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-09T00:03:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-01en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/30269-
dc.description.abstractThe neural processing of a visual stimulus can be facilitated by attending to its position or by a co-occurring auditory tone. Using frequency-tagging, we investigated whether facilitation by spatial attention and audio-visual synchrony rely on similar neural processes. Participants attended to one of two flickering Gabor patches (14.17 and 17 Hz) located in opposite lower visual fields. Gabor patches further “pulsed” (i.e. showed smooth spatial frequency variations) at distinct rates (3.14 and 3.63 Hz). Frequency-modulating an auditory stimulus at the pulse-rate of one of the visual stimuli established audio-visual synchrony. Flicker and pulsed stimulation elicited stimulus-locked rhythmic electrophysiological brain responses that allowed tracking the neural processing of simultaneously presented Gabor patches. These steady-state responses (SSRs) were quantified in the spectral domain to examine visual stimulus processing under conditions of synchronous vs. asynchronous tone presentation and when respective stimulus positions were attended vs. unattended. Strikingly, unique patterns of effects on pulse- and flicker driven SSRs indicated that spatial attention and audiovisual synchrony facilitated early visual processing in parallel and via different cortical processes. We found attention effects to resemble the classical top-down gain effect facilitating both, flicker and pulse-driven SSRs. Audio-visual synchrony, in turn, only amplified synchrony-producing stimulus aspects (i.e. pulse-driven SSRs) possibly highlighting the role of temporally co-occurring sights and sounds in bottom-up multisensory integration.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_UK
dc.relationCovic A, Keitel C, Porcu E, Schröger E & Müller MM (2017) Audio-visual synchrony and spatial attention enhance processing of dynamic visual stimulation independently and in parallel: A frequency-tagging study. NeuroImage, 161, pp. 32-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.08.022en_UK
dc.rightsAccepted refereed manuscript of: Covic A, Keitel C, Porcu E, Schröger E & Müller MM (2017) Audio-visual synchrony and spatial attention enhance processing of dynamic visual stimulation independently and in parallel: A frequency-tagging study. NeuroImage, 161, pp. 32-42. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.08.022 © 2019, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectSpatial attentionen_UK
dc.subjectSelective attentionen_UK
dc.subjectMultisensory integrationen_UK
dc.subjectAudio-visual synchronyen_UK
dc.subjectBrain oscillationen_UK
dc.subjectNeural rhythmen_UK
dc.subjectSteady-state response (SSR)en_UK
dc.subjectEEGen_UK
dc.subjectBrain-computer interface (BCI)en_UK
dc.titleAudio-visual synchrony and spatial attention enhance processing of dynamic visual stimulation independently and in parallel: A frequency-tagging studyen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2019-10-08en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.08.022en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid28802870en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleNeuroImageen_UK
dc.citation.issn1095-9572en_UK
dc.citation.issn1053-8119en_UK
dc.citation.volume161en_UK
dc.citation.spage32en_UK
dc.citation.epage42en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusAM - Accepted Manuscripten_UK
dc.contributor.funderDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaften_UK
dc.citation.date09/08/2017en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity Leipzigen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgowen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationOtto von Guericke University Magdeburgen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity Leipzigen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity Leipzigen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000415673100004en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85027520959en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1431460en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-2597-5499en_UK
dc.date.accepted2017-08-06en_UK
dc.description.refREF Compliant by Deposit in other institution's Repository: Glasgow's repository on 11/08/017: http://eprints.gla.ac.uk/145770/en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2019-10-08en_UK
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles

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