Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30183
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Reducing the Social Gradient in Uptake of the NHS Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme Using a Narrative-Based Information Leaflet: A Cluster-Randomised Trial
Author(s): McGregor, Lesley M
von Wagner, Christian
Atkin, Wendy
Kralj-Hans, Ines
Halloran, Stephen P
Handley, Graham
Logan, Richard F
Rainbow, Sandra
Smith, Steve
Snowball, Julia
Thomas, Mary C
Smith, Samuel G
Vart, Gemma
Howe, Rosemary
Counsell, Nicholas
Issue Date: 2016
Citation: McGregor LM, von Wagner C, Atkin W, Kralj-Hans I, Halloran SP, Handley G, Logan RF, Rainbow S, Smith S, Snowball J, Thomas MC, Smith SG, Vart G, Howe R & Counsell N (2016) Reducing the Social Gradient in Uptake of the NHS Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme Using a Narrative-Based Information Leaflet: A Cluster-Randomised Trial. Wilson C (Editor) Gastroenterology Research and Practice, 2016, Art. No.: 3670150. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/3670150
Abstract: Objective. To test the effectiveness of adding a narrative leaflet to the current information material delivered by the NHS English colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme on reducing socioeconomic inequalities in uptake. Participants. 150,417 adults (59–74 years) routinely invited to complete the guaiac Faecal Occult Blood test (gFOBt) in March 2013. Design. A cluster randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN74121020) to compare uptake between two arms. The control arm received the standard NHS CRC screening information material (SI) and the intervention arm received the standard information plus a supplementary narrative leaflet, which had previously been shown to increase screening intentions (SI + N). Between group comparisons were made for uptake overall and across socioeconomic status (SES). Results. Uptake was 57.7% and did not differ significantly between the two trial arms (SI: 58.5%; SI + N: 56.7%; odds ratio = 0.93; 95% confidence interval: 0.81–1.06; ). There was no interaction between group and SES quintile (). Conclusions. Adding a narrative leaflet to existing information materials does not reduce the SES gradient in uptake. Despite the benefits of using a pragmatic trial design, the need to add to, rather than replace, existing information may have limited the true value of an evidence-based intervention on behaviour. We dedicate this paper in memory of Professor Jane Wardle (1950–2015)
DOI Link: 10.1155/2016/3670150
Rights: © 2016 Lesley M. McGregor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Notes: Additional co-authors: Allan Hackshaw, Stephen Morris, Stephen W Duffy, Rosalind Raine, Jane Wardle
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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