Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30038
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Book Chapters and Sections
Title: Established and Emerging Techniques for Characterising the Formation, Structure and Performance of Calcified Structures under Ocean Acidification
Author(s): Fitzer, Susan C
Bin San Chan, Vera
Meng, Yuan
Chandra Rajan, Kanmani
Suzuki, Michio
Not, Christelle
Toyofuku, Takashi
Falkenberg, Laura
Byrne, Maria
Harvey, Ben P
de Wit, Pierre
Cusack, Maggie
Gao, K S
Taylor, Paul
Dupont, Sam
Hall-Spencer, Jason M
Thiyagarajan, V
Contact Email: susan.fitzer@stir.ac.uk
Editor(s): Hawkins, S J
Allcock, A L
Bates, A E
Firth, L B
Smith, I P
Swearer, S E
Todd, P A
Sponsor: NERC Natural Environment Research Council
Citation: Fitzer SC, Bin San Chan V, Meng Y, Chandra Rajan K, Suzuki M, Not C, Toyofuku T, Falkenberg L, Byrne M, Harvey BP, de Wit P, Cusack M, Gao KS, Taylor P, Dupont S, Hall-Spencer JM & Thiyagarajan V (2019) Established and Emerging Techniques for Characterising the Formation, Structure and Performance of Calcified Structures under Ocean Acidification. In: Hawkins SJ, Allcock AL, Bates AE, Firth LB, Smith IP, Swearer SE & Todd PA (eds.) Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review. Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review, 57. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press, pp. 89-126. https://www.crcpress.com/Oceanography-and-Marine-Biology-An-Annual-Review-Volume-57/Hawkins-Allcock-Bates-Firth-Smith-Swearer-Todd/p/book/9780367134150; https://doi.org/10.1201/9780429026379
Issue Date: 2019
Series/Report no.: Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review, 57
Abstract: Ocean acidification (OA) is the decline in seawater pH and saturation levels of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals that has led to concerns for calcifying organisms such as corals, oysters and mussels because of the adverse effects of OA on their biomineralisation, shells and skeletons. A range of cellular biology, geochemistry and materials science approaches have been used to explore biomineralisation. These techniques have revealed that responses to seawater acidification can be highly variable among species, yet the underlying mechanisms remain largely unresolved. To assess the impacts of global OA, researchers will need to apply a range of tools developed across disciplines, many of which are emerging and have not yet been used in this context. This review outlines techniques that could be applied to study OA-induced alterations in the mechanisms of biomineralisation and their ultimate effects on shells and skeletons. We illustrate how to characterise, quantify and monitor the process of biomineralisation in the context of global climate change and OA. We highlight the basic principles, as well as the advantages and disadvantages, of established, emerging and future techniques for OA researchers. A combination of these techniques will enable a holistic approach and better understanding of the potential impact of OA on biomineralisation and its consequences for marine calcifiers and associated ecosystems.
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is an Accepted Manuscript of a chapter published by Taylor & Francis Group in Hawkins S, Allcock A, Bates A, Firth L, Smith I, Swearer S & Todd P (eds.) Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review. Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review, 57. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press, pp. 89-126 on 19 Aug 2019, available online: https://www.crcpress.com/Oceanography-and-Marine-Biology-An-Annual-Review-Volume-57/Hawkins-Allcock-Bates-Firth-Smith-Swearer-Todd/p/book/9780367134150
URL: https://www.crcpress.com/Oceanography-and-Marine-Biology-An-Annual-Review-Volume-57/Hawkins-Allcock-Bates-Firth-Smith-Swearer-Todd/p/book/9780367134150
DOI Link: 10.1201/9780429026379

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