Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/29932
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dc.contributor.authorBranley-Bell, Dawnen_UK
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Daryl Ben_UK
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Jessica Aen_UK
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Eamonnen_UK
dc.contributor.authorO'Carroll, Ronan Een_UK
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Rory Cen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30T00:02:58Z-
dc.date.available2019-07-30T00:02:58Z-
dc.date.issued2019-10en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/29932-
dc.description.abstractSuicidal behaviour poses a significant public health concern. Research into the factors that distinguish between the emergence of suicide ideation and the enactment of a suicide attempt is crucial. This study tests central tenets of the Integrated Motivational-Volitional Model of suicidal behaviour (IMV, O’Connor and Kirtley, 2018) which posits that volitional phase factors govern the transition from thinking to attempting suicide. 299 adults completed a face-to-face interview and were allocated to groups based on their suicidal history: Suicide attempt group (N = 100), suicide ideation group (N = 105), and a control group (N = 94). Measures were taken at baseline, at 1-month and 6-months follow-up. As predicted, the attempt group differed from the ideation group on all volitional phase factors. Those who had attempted suicide reported higher capability for suicide, were more likely to have a family member or friend who had self-injured or attempted suicide, and were more impulsive. In keeping with the IMV model, the ideation and attempt groups had similar scores on the motivational factors. Defeat and entrapment were significant predictors of ideation at baseline, and mediation analyses indicated that defeat had an indirect effect on ideation through entrapment at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. The results support the IMV model and suggest that entrapment should be routinely included in suicide risk assessments. Further research to test predictors of the transition from suicide ideation to suicide attempts is crucial to inform future intervention development and health care delivery.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherElsevieren_UK
dc.relationBranley-Bell D, O'Connor DB, Green JA, Ferguson E, O'Carroll RE & O'Connor RC (2019) Distinguishing suicide ideation from suicide attempts: Further test of the Integrated Motivational-Volitional Model of Suicidal Behaviour. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 117, pp. 100-107. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.07.007en_UK
dc.rightsThis item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Branley-Bell D, O'Connor DB, Green JA, Ferguson E, O'Carroll RE, O'Connor RC, Distinguishing suicide ideation from suicide attempts: Further test of the Integrated Motivational-Volitional Model of Suicidal Behaviour, Journal of Psychiatric Research (2019),117, pp. 100-107. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.07.007. © 2019, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectSuicideen_UK
dc.subjectPsychologyen_UK
dc.subjectRisken_UK
dc.subjectPublic healthen_UK
dc.subjectDefeaten_UK
dc.subjectEntrapmenten_UK
dc.titleDistinguishing suicide ideation from suicide attempts: Further test of the Integrated Motivational-Volitional Model of Suicidal Behaviouren_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2020-07-28en_UK
dc.rights.embargoreason[1-s2.0-S0022395619303115-main.pdf] Publisher requires embargo of 12 months after formal publication.en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.07.007en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid31376620en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleJournal of Psychiatric Researchen_UK
dc.citation.issn0022-3956en_UK
dc.citation.volume117en_UK
dc.citation.spage100en_UK
dc.citation.epage107en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusAM - Accepted Manuscripten_UK
dc.author.emailronan.ocarroll@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date27/07/2019en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Leedsen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Leedsen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Leedsen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Nottinghamen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationPsychologyen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgowen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000484872500013en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1419292en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-5130-291Xen_UK
dc.date.accepted2019-07-26en_UK
dc.description.refREF Compliant by Deposit in Stirling's Repositoryen_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2019-07-29en_UK
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles

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