Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/29838
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Human-driven habitat conversion is a more immediate threat to Amboseli elephants than climate change
Author(s): Boult, Victoria L
Fishlock, Vicki
Quaife, Tristan
Hawkins, Ed
Moss, Cynthia
Lee, Phyllis C
Sibly, Richard M
Keywords: climate change
conservation planning
elephants
habitat loss
individual‐based model
Issue Date: Sep-2019
Citation: Boult VL, Fishlock V, Quaife T, Hawkins E, Moss C, Lee PC & Sibly RM (2019) Human-driven habitat conversion is a more immediate threat to Amboseli elephants than climate change. Conservation Science and Practice, 1 (9), Art. No.: e87. https://doi.org/10.1111/csp2.87
Abstract: Global ecosystem change presents a major challenge to biodiversity conservation, which must identify and prioritize the most critical threats to species persistence given limited available funding. Mechanistic models enable robust predictions under future conditions and can consider multiple stressors in combination. Here we use an individual‐based model (IBM) to predict elephant population size in Amboseli, southern Kenya, under environmental scenarios incorporating climate change and anthropogenic habitat loss. The IBM uses projected food availability as a key driver of elephant population dynamics and relates variation in food availability to changes in vital demographic rates through an energy budget. Habitat loss, rather than climate change, represents the most significant threat to the persistence of the Amboseli elephant population in the 21st century and highlights the importance of collaborations and agreements that preserve space for Amboseli elephants to ensure the population remains resilient to environmental stochasticity.
DOI Link: 10.1111/csp2.87
Rights: © 2019 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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