Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/29528
Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Why are social scientists still reluctant to embrace email as data? An ethnographic examination of interactions within virtual teams
Author(s): Marks, Abigail
Au, Yee Wei (Carol)
Contact Email: abigail.marks@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: conflict
culture
email
ethnography
triangulation
virtual teams
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2013
Citation: Marks A & Au YW( (2013) Why are social scientists still reluctant to embrace email as data? An ethnographic examination of interactions within virtual teams. Work, Employment and Society, 27 (5), pp. 880-890. https://doi.org/10.1177/0950017013494436
Abstract: This research note examines why email is underused as a source of data within work and employment studies and provides an example of the usefulness of email for gaining a more detailed understanding of behaviour in the workplace. Three main reasons are identified for the hesitancy to use email as a source of data. Firstly, the confused role of email as formal and informal archival data as well as concerns regarding the immediate often non-deliberated exchanges; secondly, issues with access to and confidentiality of email data; finally, the challenges of triangulation of a data set which includes email data. The analysis of emails between virtual team members, alongside observational and interview methods, demonstrates how interactions between colleagues via email are subtly different to the way in which organizational members describe relationships in an interview situation and reveals how access to email data provides an additional resource in understanding behaviours within the workplace.
DOI Link: 10.1177/0950017013494436
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