Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/29442
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Attitudes towards returning wolves (Canis lupus) in Germany: Exposure, information sources and trust matter
Author(s): Arbieu, Ugo
Mehring, Marion
Bunnefeld, Nils
Kaczensky, Petra
Reinhardt, Ilka
Ansorge, Hermann
Böhning-Gaese, Katrin
Glikman, Jenny A
Kluth, Gesa
Nowak, Carsten
Müller, Thomas
Contact Email: nils.bunnefeld@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Attitudes
Human-wildlife coexistence
Large carnivores
Media
Science communication
Social survey
Issue Date: Jun-2019
Citation: Arbieu U, Mehring M, Bunnefeld N, Kaczensky P, Reinhardt I, Ansorge H, Böhning-Gaese K, Glikman JA, Kluth G, Nowak C & Müller T (2019) Attitudes towards returning wolves (Canis lupus) in Germany: Exposure, information sources and trust matter. Biological Conservation, 234, pp. 202-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2019.03.027
Abstract: Understanding how exposure and information affect public attitudes towards returning large carnivores in Europe is critical for human-carnivore coexistence, especially for developing efficient and de-escalating communication strategies. The ongoing recolonization of wolves (Canis lupus) in Germany provides a unique opportunity to test the role of different information sources and trust on people's attitudes towards wolves. We conducted a phone survey (n = 1250) and compared country-wide attitudes towards wolves with attitudes in a specific region where wolves initially recolonized and have been present since 2000. In particular, we investigate the relationship between information sources, trust and people's attitudes while accounting for factors like knowledge, exposure and socio-cultural determinants of respondents. We found significant differences in attitudes and knowledge about wolves as well as in the use and frequency of information sources between the two population samples. Higher knowledge, information from books and films, science-based information, and higher trust in information sources related positively with positive attitudes towards wolves. Comparatively, information from press or TV news was associated with more negative attitudes. Providing science-based information to the public and building trust in information is likely to be one measure, among others, to dampen extreme attitudes and improve people's appreciation of costs and benefits of human-carnivore coexistence. Management of conflictual situations emerging from large carnivore recolonization in Europe and beyond should consider incorporating assessments of people's use of and trust in information in addition to existing tools to pave new ways for constructive human-carnivore coexistence.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.biocon.2019.03.027
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Arbieu U, Mehring M, Bunnefeld N, Kaczensky P, Reinhardt I, Ansorge H, Böhning-Gaese K, Glikman JA, Kluth G, Nowak C & Müller T (2019) Attitudes towards returning wolves (Canis lupus) in Germany: Exposure, information sources and trust matter. Biological Conservation, 234, pp. 202-210. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2019.03.027 © 2019, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Supporting_Information_V2.pdfFulltext - Accepted Version606.35 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 2020-04-06    Request a copy
Arbieu_2019_BiolConserv_Preproof.pdfFulltext - Accepted Version918.45 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 2020-04-06    Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependent on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.



This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.