Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28619
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Does Adult Sex Ratio Predict Regional Variation in Facial Dominance Perceptions? Evidence From an Analysis of U.S. States
Author(s): Torrance, Jaimie S
Kandrik, Michal
Lee, Anthony J
DeBruine, Lisa M
Jones, Benedict C
Keywords: social perceptions
face perceptions
dominance judgements
adult sex ratio
intrasexual competition
Issue Date: 30-Jun-2018
Citation: Torrance JS, Kandrik M, Lee AJ, DeBruine LM & Jones BC (2018) Does Adult Sex Ratio Predict Regional Variation in Facial Dominance Perceptions? Evidence From an Analysis of U.S. States. Evolutionary Psychology, 16 (2). https://doi.org/10.1177/1474704918776748
Abstract: When the adult sex ratio of the local population is biased toward women, men face greater costs due to increased direct intrasexual competition. In order to mitigate these costs, men may be more attuned to cues of other men’s physical dominance under these conditions. Consequently, we investigated the relationships between the extent to which people (N = 3,586) ascribed high dominance to masculinized versus feminized faces and variation in adult sex ratio across U.S. states. Linear mixed models showed that masculinized faces were perceived as more dominant than feminized faces, particularly for judgments of men’s facial dominance. Dominance perceptions were weakly related to adult sex ratio, and this relationship was not moderated by face sex, participant sex, or their interaction. Thus, our results suggest that dominance perceptions are relatively unaffected by broad geographical differences in adult sex ratios.
DOI Link: 10.1177/1474704918776748
Rights: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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