Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28615
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dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Marie Men_UK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Anthony Jen_UK
dc.contributor.authorFeinberg, David Ren_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-25T01:01:23Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-25T01:01:23Z-
dc.date.issued2019-01-31en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/28615-
dc.description.abstractTheories of the evolution of low voice pitch in men are based on the idea that voice pitch is an honest indicator of physical dominance, but relationships among pitch, physical body size and strength among same sex adults voice are weak and unstable. Nevertheless, judgements of body size based on voice pitch are the result of perceptual bias that low frequencies sound large. If dominance judgements are based in part on perception of size, then dominance perception could also be the result of perceptual bias. Thus, we tested if the relationship between voice pitch and judgements of height mediated the relationship between voice pitch and dominance judgements. The relationship between voice pitch and perceived height fully mediated the relationship between voice pitch and dominance. This was driven by the portion of variance that was inaccurate in height perception (i.e. residual error), and not conditional upon actual height, or perceptions thereof. Collectively our results demonstrate that the relationship between voice pitch and perceived dominance is not based on observation of real world relationships between physical size and voice pitch, but rather based on a bias to perceive low pitched voices as large people. Hence, the relationship between dominance and voice pitch is coincidental rather than causal. Thus, since the relationship between physical dominance and voice pitch is conditional upon the relationship between a biased perception of body size, voice pitch is not an honest indicator of physical dominance. Consequently, the evolution of low pitch in men’s voices cannot be explained by selection for accurate dominance cues.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_UK
dc.relationArmstrong MM, Lee AJ & Feinberg DR (2019) A house of cards: bias in perception of body size mediates the relationship between voice pitch and perceptions of dominance. Animal Behaviour, 147, pp. 43-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.11.005en_UK
dc.rightsThis item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Armstrong M, Lee A & Feinberg D (2019) A house of cards: bias in perception of body size mediates the relationship between voice pitch and perceptions of dominance. Animal Behaviour, 147, pp. 43-51. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.11.005 © 2018, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectbiasen_UK
dc.subjectbody sizeen_UK
dc.subjectdominanceen_UK
dc.subjectformanten_UK
dc.subjectformidabilityen_UK
dc.subjectfundamentalen_UK
dc.subjectheighten_UK
dc.subjectpitchen_UK
dc.subjectsensory exploitationen_UK
dc.subjectvoiceen_UK
dc.titleA house of cards: bias in perception of body size mediates the relationship between voice pitch and perceptions of dominanceen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2019-12-11en_UK
dc.rights.embargoreason[Final20Accepted20Version.pdf] Publisher requires embargo of 12 months after formal publication.en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.11.005en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleAnimal Behaviouren_UK
dc.citation.issn0003-3472en_UK
dc.citation.volume147en_UK
dc.citation.spage43en_UK
dc.citation.epage51en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusAM - Accepted Manuscripten_UK
dc.contributor.funderOntario Ministry of Research an InnovationOntario Ministry of Research an Innovation (MRI)en_UK
dc.contributor.funderNatural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of CanadaNatural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)en_UK
dc.author.emailanthony.lee@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date10/12/2018en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationMcMaster Universityen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgowen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationMcMaster Universityen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000455323900007en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85058046735en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1094798en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-8288-3393en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-4179-1446en_UK
dc.date.accepted2018-10-22en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2019-01-23en_UK
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles

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