Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28581
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dc.contributor.authorDaw, Tim Men_UK
dc.contributor.authorCinner, Joshua Een_UK
dc.contributor.authorMcClanahan, Timothy Ren_UK
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Katrinaen_UK
dc.contributor.authorStead, Selina Men_UK
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Nicholas A Jen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMaina, Josephen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-19T01:05:31Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-19T01:05:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-10en_UK
dc.identifier.othere31460en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/28581-
dc.description.abstractlobally, fisheries are challenged by the combined impacts of overfishing, degradation of ecosystems and impacts of climate change, while fisheries livelihoods are further pressured by conservation policy imperatives. Fishers' adaptive responses to these pressures, such as exiting from a fishery to pursue alternative livelihoods, determine their own vulnerability, as well as the potential for reducing fishing effort and sustaining fisheries. The willingness and ability to make particular adaptations in response to change, such as exiting from a declining fishery, is influenced by economic, cultural and institutional factors operating at scales from individual fishers to national economies. Previous studies of exit from fisheries at single or few sites, offer limited insight into the relative importance of individual and larger-scale social and economic factors. We asked 599 fishers how they would respond to hypothetical scenarios of catch declines in 28 sites in five western Indian Ocean countries. We investigated how socioeconomic variables at the individual-, household- and site-scale affected whether they would exit fisheries. Site-level factors had the greatest influence on readiness to exit, but these relationships were contrary to common predictions. Specifically, higher levels of infrastructure development and economic vitality - expected to promote exit from fisheries - were associated with less readiness to exit. This may be due to site level histories of exit from fisheries, greater specialisation of fishing households, or higher rewards from fishing in more economically developed sites due to technology, market access, catch value and government subsidies. At the individual and household scale, fishers from households with more livelihood activities, and fishers with lower catch value were more willing to exit. These results demonstrate empirically how adaptive responses to change are influenced by factors at multiple scales, and highlight the importance of understanding natural resource-based livelihoods in the context of the wider economy and society.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_UK
dc.relationDaw TM, Cinner JE, McClanahan TR, Brown K, Stead SM, Graham NAJ & Maina J (2012) To Fish or not to Fish: Factors at multiple scales affecting artisanal fishers' readiness to exit a declining fishery. PLoS ONE, 7 (2), Art. No.: e31460. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0031460en_UK
dc.rights© 2012 Daw et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_UK
dc.titleTo Fish or not to Fish: Factors at multiple scales affecting artisanal fishers' readiness to exit a declining fisheryen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0031460en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid22348090en_UK
dc.citation.jtitlePLoS ONEen_UK
dc.citation.issn1932-6203en_UK
dc.citation.volume7en_UK
dc.citation.issue2en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderEconomic and Social Research Councilen_UK
dc.citation.date10/02/2012en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of East Angliaen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationJames Cook Universityen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationWildlife Conservation Societyen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of East Angliaen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute of Aquacultureen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationJames Cook Universityen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationMacquarie Universityen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS: WOS:000302730900027en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84856793566en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1090274en_UK
dc.date.accepted2012-01-08en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2019-01-17en_UK
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles

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