Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28541
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Received social support and exercising: An intervention study to test the enabling hypothesis
Author(s): Rackow, Pamela
Scholz, Urte
Hornung, Rainer
Contact Email: pamela.rackow@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: received social support
intervention study
physical exercise
enabling
self‐efficacy
volitional factors
Issue Date: 30-Nov-2015
Citation: Rackow P, Scholz U & Hornung R (2015) Received social support and exercising: An intervention study to test the enabling hypothesis. British Journal of Health Psychology, 20 (4), pp. 763-776. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12139.
Abstract: Objectives Received social support is considered important for health-enhancing exercise participation. The enabling hypothesis of social support suggests an indirect association of social support and exercising via constructs of self-regulation, such as self-efficacy. This study aimed at examining an expanded enabling hypothesis by examining effects of different kinds of social support (i.e., emotional and instrumental) on exercising not only via self-efficacy but also via self-monitoring and action planning. Design and methods An 8-week online study was conducted. Participants were randomly assigned to an intervention or a control group. The intervention comprised finding and then exercising regularly with a new exercise companion. Intervention and control group effects were compared by a manifest multigroup model. Results Received emotional social support predicted self-efficacy, self-monitoring, and action planning in the intervention group. Moreover, received emotional social support was indirectly connected with exercise via the examined mediators. The indirect effect from received emotional social support via self-efficacy mainly contributed to the total effect. No direct or indirect effect of received instrumental social support on exercise emerged. In the control group, neither emotional nor instrumental social support was associated with any of the self-regulation constructs nor with exercise. Conclusion Actively looking for a new exercise companion and exercising together seems to be beneficial for the promotion of received emotional and instrumental social support. Emotional support in turn promotes exercise by enabling better self-regulation, in particular self-efficacy.
DOI Link: 10.1111/bjhp.12139
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Received social support and exercising An intervention study to test the enabling hypothesis.pdfFulltext - Published Version261.17 kBAdobe PDFUnder Permanent Embargo    Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependent on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.



This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.