Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28464
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Buzz pollination: studying bee vibrations on flowers
Author(s): Vallejo-Marin, Mario
Contact Email: mario.vallejo@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Bees
behaviour biomechanics
biotremology
buzz pollination
floral evolution
sonication
vibrations
Issue Date: Nov-2019
Citation: Vallejo-Marin M (2019) Buzz pollination: studying bee vibrations on flowers. New Phytologist, 224 (3), pp. 1068-1074. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.15666
Abstract: Approximately 6% of flowering plant species possess flowers with anthers that open through small pores or slits. Extracting pollen from this type of specialised flower is achieved most efficiently by vibrating the anthers, a behaviour that has evolved repeatedly among bees. Here I provide a brief overview of studying vibrations produced by bees and their effects on pollen release. I discuss how bee morphology and behaviour affect the mechanical properties of vibrations, and how floral traits may influence the transmission of those vibrations from the bee to the anther, thus mediating pollen release, and ultimately bee and plant fitness. I suggest that understanding the evolution of buzz pollination requires studying the biomechanics of bee vibrations and their transmission on flowers.
DOI Link: 10.1111/nph.15666
Rights: This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1111/nph.15666 The definitive version is available at www.newphytologist.com

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