Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28127
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Intervention for mixed receptive-expressive language impairment: A review
Author(s): Boyle, James
McCartney, Elspeth
O'Hare, Anne E
Law, James
Contact Email: elspeth.mccartney@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: 30-Nov-2010
Citation: Boyle J, McCartney E, O'Hare AE & Law J (2010) Intervention for mixed receptive-expressive language impairment: A review. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 52 (11), pp. 994-999. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03750.x.
Abstract: Studies indicate that language impairment that cannot be accounted for by factors such as below-average non-verbal ability, hearing impairment, behaviour or emotional problems, or neurological impairments affects some 6% of school-age children. Language impairment with a receptive language component is more resistant to intervention than specific expressive or phonological delays, and carries a greater risk of comorbid behavioural difficulties as well as adverse outcomes for language development and academic progress. This paper considers underlying explanations that may account for receptive-expressive language impairment. It also reviews evidence for the effectiveness of intervention from theory and recent systematic reviews, trials, and speech and language therapy practice..
DOI Link: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03750.x
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