Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28119
Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Transgressing the moral economy: Wheelerism and management of the nationalised coal industry in Scotland
Author(s): Perchard, Andrew
Phillips, Jim
Contact Email: a.c.perchard@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Coal
management style
industrial relations
miners' strike
moral economy
Issue Date: 30-Sep-2011
Citation: Perchard A & Phillips J (2011) Transgressing the moral economy: Wheelerism and management of the nationalised coal industry in Scotland. Contemporary British History, 25 (3), pp. 387-405. https://doi.org/10.1080/13619462.2011.597550.
Abstract: This article illuminates the links between managerial style and political economy in post- 1945 Britain, and explores the origins of the 1984-1985 miners' strike, by examining in longer historical context the abrasive attitudes and policies of Albert Wheeler, Scottish Area Director of the National Coal Board (NCB). Wheeler built on an earlier emphasis on production and economic criteria, and his micro-management reflected pre-existing centralising tendencies in the industries. But he was innovative in one crucial aspect, transgressing the moral economy of the Scottish coalfield, which emphasised the value of economic security and changes by joint industrial agreement. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.
DOI Link: 10.1080/13619462.2011.597550
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