Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27457
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The seaweed fly (Coelopidae) can facilitate environmental survival and transmission of E. coli O157 at sandy beaches
Author(s): Swinscoe, Isobel
Oliver, David M.
Gilburn, Andre S.
Quilliam, Richard S.
Contact Email: david.oliver@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Environmental Engineering
Waste Management and Disposal
Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
General Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2018
Citation: Swinscoe I, Oliver DM, Gilburn AS & Quilliam RS (2018) The seaweed fly (Coelopidae) can facilitate environmental survival and transmission of E. coli O157 at sandy beaches. Journal of Environmental Management, 223, pp. 275-285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.06.045
Abstract: The sustainable management of recreational beaches is essential for minimising risk of human exposure to microbial pathogens whilst simultaneously maintaining valuable ecosystem services. Decaying seaweed on public beaches is gaining recognition as a substrate for microbial contamination, and is a potentially significant reservoir for human pathogens in close proximity to beach users. Closely associated with beds of decaying seaweed are dense populations of the seaweed fly (Coelopidae), which could influence the spatio-temporal fate of seaweed-associated human pathogens within beach environments. Replicated mesocosms containing seaweed inoculated with a bioluminescent strain of the zoonotic pathogen E. coli O157:H7, were used to determine the effects of two seaweed flies, Coelopa frigida and C. pilipes, on E. coli O157:H7 survival dynamics. Multiple generations of seaweed flies and their larvae significantly enhanced persistence of E. coli O157:H7 in simulated wrack habitats, demonstrating that both female and male C. frigida flies are capable of transferring E. coli O157:H7 between individual wrack beds and into the sand. Adult fly faeces can contain significant concentrations of E. coli O157:H7, which suggests they are capable of acting as biological vectors and bridge hosts between wrack habitats and other seaweed fly populations, and facilitate the persistence and dispersal of E. coli O157:H7 in sandy beach environments. This study provides the first evidence that seaweed fly populations inhabiting natural wrack beds contaminated with the human pathogen E. coli O157:H7 have the capacity to amplify the hazard source, and therefore potential transmission risk, to beach users exposed to seaweed and sand in the intertidal zone. The risk to public health from seaweed flies and decaying wrack beds is usually limited by human avoidance behaviour; however, seaweed fly migration and nuisance inland plagues in urban areas could increase human exposure routes beyond the beach environment.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.06.045
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Swinscoe I, Oliver DM, Gilburn AS & Quilliam RS (2018) The seaweed fly (Coelopidae) can facilitate environmental survival and transmission of E. coli O157 at sandy beaches, Journal of Environmental Management, 223, pp. 275-285. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.06.045 © 2018, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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