Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27248
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dc.contributor.authorVarley, Adamen_UK
dc.contributor.authorTyler, Andrewen_UK
dc.contributor.authorBondar, Yurien_UK
dc.contributor.authorHosseini, Alien_UK
dc.contributor.authorZabrotski, Viachaslauen_UK
dc.contributor.authorDowdall, Marken_UK
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-16T00:00:15Z-
dc.date.available2018-05-16T00:00:15Zen_UK
dc.date.issued2018-09-30en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/27248-
dc.description.abstractCs-137 is considered to be the most significant anthropogenic contributor to human dose and presents a particularly difficult remediation challenge after a dispersal following nuclear incident. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant meltdown in April 1986 represents the largest nuclear accident in history and released over 80 PBq of 137Cs into the environment. As a result, much of the land in close proximity to Chernobyl, which includes the Polessie State Radioecology Reserve in Belarus, remains highly contaminated with 137Cs to such an extent they remain uninhabitable. Whilst there is a broad scale understanding of the depositional patterns within and beyond the exclusion zone, detailed mapping of the distribution is often limited. New developments in mobile gamma spectrometry provide the opportunity to map the fallout of 137Cs and begin to reconstruct the depositional environment and the long-term behaviour of 137Cs in the environment. Here, full gamma spectrum analysis using algorithms based on the peak-valley ratio derived from Monte Carlo simulations are used to estimate the total 137Cs deposition and its depth distribution in the soil. The results revealed a pattern of 137Cs distribution consistent with the deposition occurring at a time of flooding, which is validated by review of satellite imagery acquired at similar times of the year. The results were also consistent with systematic burial of the fallout 137Cs by annual flooding events. These results were validated by sediment cores collected along a transect across the flood plain. The true merit of the approach was confirmed by exposing new insights into the spatial distribution and long term fate of 137Cs across the floodplain. Such systematic patterns of behaviour are likely to be fundamental to the understanding of the radioecological behaviour of 137Cs whilst also providing a tracer for quantifying the ecological controls on sediment movement and deposition at a landscape scale.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherElsevieren_UK
dc.relationVarley A, Tyler A, Bondar Y, Hosseini A, Zabrotski V & Dowdall M (2018) Reconstructing the deposition environment and long-term fate of Chernobyl (137)Cs at the floodplain scale through mobile gamma spectrometry, Environmental Pollution, 240, pp. 191-199. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2018.04.112.en_UK
dc.rightsThis item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Varley A, Tyler A, Bondar Y, Hosseini A, Zabrotski V & Dowdall M (2018) Reconstructing the deposition environment and long-term fate of Chernobyl (137)Cs at the floodplain scale through mobile gamma spectrometry, Environmental Pollution, 240, pp. 191-199. DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2018.04.112 © 2018, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectCaesium redistributionen_UK
dc.subjectSedimentation ratesen_UK
dc.subjectFloodplain functioningen_UK
dc.subjectGamma-ray spectrometryen_UK
dc.subjectChernobylen_UK
dc.titleReconstructing the deposition environment and long-term fate of Chernobyl (137)Cs at the floodplain scale through mobile gamma spectrometryen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2019-05-05en_UK
dc.rights.embargoreason[For Storre.pdf] : Publisher requires embargo of 12 months after formal publication.en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envpol.2018.04.112en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid29738947en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleEnvironmental Pollutionen_UK
dc.citation.issn0269-7491en_UK
dc.citation.volume240en_UK
dc.citation.spage191en_UK
dc.citation.epage199en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusAM - Accepted Manuscripten_UK
dc.contributor.funderEnvironmental Protection Agencyen_UK
dc.author.emaila.l.varley@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date05/05/2018en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationPolesie State Radiation Ecological Reserveen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationNorwegian Radiation Protection Authorityen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationPolesie State Radiation Ecological Reserveen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationNorwegian Radiation Protection Authorityen_UK
dc.identifier.isi000438322100021en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85047971427en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid894233en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-0604-5827en_UK
dc.date.accepted2018-04-24en_UK
dc.date.firstcompliantdepositdate2018-05-15en_UK
dc.description.refREF Compliant by Deposit in Stirling's Repositoryen_UK
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles

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