Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27052
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Which older people decline participation in a primary care trial of physical activity and why: insights from a mixed methods approach
Author(s): Rogers, Annabelle
Harris, Tess
Victor, Christina R
Woodcock, Alison
Limb, Elizabeth S
Kerry, Sally M
Iliffe, Steve
Whincup, Peter H
Ekelund, Ulf
Beighton, Carole
Ussher, Michael
Adams, Fredrika
Cook, Derek G
Contact Email: michael.ussher@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Physical activity
non-participation
primary care
older people
recruitment
Issue Date: 12-Apr-2014
Citation: Rogers A, Harris T, Victor CR, Woodcock A, Limb ES, Kerry SM, Iliffe S, Whincup PH, Ekelund U, Beighton C, Ussher M, Adams F & Cook DG (2014) Which older people decline participation in a primary care trial of physical activity and why: insights from a mixed methods approach, BMC Geriatrics, 14, Art. No.: 46.
Abstract: Background: Physical activity is of vital importance to older peoples' health. Physical activity intervention studies with older people often have low recruitment, yet little is known about non-participants.  Methods: Patients aged 60-74 years from three UK general practices were invited to participate in a nurse-supported pedometer-based walking intervention. Demographic characteristics of 298 participants and 690 non-participants were compared. Health status and physical activity of 298 participants and 183 non-participants who completed a survey were compared using age, sex adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals). 15 non-participants were interviewed to explore perceived barriers to participation.  Results: Recruitment was 30% (298/988). Participants were more likely than non-participants to be female (54% v 47%; p = 0.04) and to live in affluent postcodes (73% v 62% in top quintile; p < 0.001). Participants were more likely than non-participants who completed the survey to have an occupational pension OR 2.06 (1.35-3.13), a limiting longstanding illness OR 1.72 (1.05-2.79) and less likely to report being active OR 0.55 (0.33-0.93) or walking fast OR 0.56 (0.37-0.84). Interviewees supported general practice-based physical activity studies, particularly walking, but barriers to participation included: already sufficiently active, reluctance to walk alone or at night, physical symptoms, depression, time constraints, trial equipment and duration.  Conclusion: Gender and deprivation differences suggest some selection bias. However, trial participants reported more health problems and lower activity than non-participants who completed the survey, suggesting appropriate trial selection in a general practice population. Non-participant interviewees indicated that shorter interventions, addressing physical symptoms and promoting confidence in pursuing physical activity, might increase trial recruitment and uptake of practice-based physical activity endeavours.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2318-14-46
Rights: © Rogers et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014 This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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