Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26979
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dc.contributor.authorKing, David N-
dc.contributor.authorEiser, David-
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-13T22:22:58Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/26979-
dc.description.abstractBlock grants to the UK's devolved administrations are allocated using the Barnett Formula. There have been calls to replace this formula with one based on spending needs assessment, but two obstacles to doing so have been raised. First, that the devolved administrations would be unable to agree on how needs should be assessed; and second, it is unclear how needs assessment might work for devolved governments that can pursue different spending policies. This paper investigates the first issue by analysing whether the Scottish and English formulae for allocating health and education funding within each country are statistically similar; and the second issue through a hypothetical policy simulation analysis.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherTaylor and Francis-
dc.relationKing DN & Eiser D (2016) Reform of the Barnett Formula with Needs Assessment: Can the Challenges be Overcome?, Regional Studies, 50 (5), pp. 790-804.-
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.-
dc.subjectBarnett Formulaen_UK
dc.subjectSpending needs assessmenten_UK
dc.subjectDevolved governmenten_UK
dc.titleReform of the Barnett Formula with Needs Assessment: Can the Challenges be Overcome?en_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00343404.2014.933799-
dc.citation.jtitleRegional Studies-
dc.citation.issn0034-3404-
dc.citation.volume50-
dc.citation.issue5-
dc.citation.spage790-
dc.citation.epage804-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.author.emaildavid.eiser@stir.ac.uk-
dc.citation.date18/08/2014-
dc.contributor.affiliationEconomics-
dc.contributor.affiliationEconomics-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
dc.identifier.isi000372971700003-
Appears in Collections:Economics Journal Articles

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