Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26642
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The effect of noun phrase length on the form of referring expressions
Author(s): Karimi, Hossein
Fukumura, Kumiko
Ferreira, Fernanda
Pickering, Martin J
Keywords: Length
Language production
Referring expressions
Accessibility
Issue Date: Aug-2014
Citation: Karimi H, Fukumura K, Ferreira F & Pickering MJ (2014) The effect of noun phrase length on the form of referring expressions, Memory and Cognition, 42 (6), pp. 993-1009.
Abstract: The length of a noun phrase has been shown to influence choices such as syntactic role assignment (e.g., whether the noun phrase is realized as the subject or the object). But does length also affect the choice between different forms of referring expressions? Three experiments investigated the effect of antecedent length on the choice between pronouns (e.g., he) and repeated nouns (e.g., the actor) using a sentence-continuation paradigm. Experiments 1 and 2 found an effect of antecedent length on written continuations: Participants used more pronouns (relative to repeated nouns) when the antecedent was longer than when it was shorter. Experiment 3 used a spoken continuation task and replicated the effect of antecedent length on the choice of referring expressions. Taken together, the results suggest that longer antecedents increase the likelihood of pronominal reference. The results support theories arguing that length enhances the accessibility of the associated entity through richer semantic encoding.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0400-7
Rights: Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository. Karimi, H., Fukumura, K., Ferreira, F. et al. Mem Cogn (2014) 42: 993. The final publication is available at Springer via https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0400-7

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