Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26608
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The emergence of a commercial trade in pangolins from Gabon (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Author(s): Mambeya, Meine M
Baker, Francesca
Momboua, Brice R
Koumba Pambo, Aurélie Flore
Hega, Martin
Okouyi Okouyi, V Joseph
Onanga, Martial
Challender, Daniel W S
Ingram, Daniel J
Wang, Hongyan
Abernethy, Katharine
Contact Email: k.a.abernethy@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: pangolins
illegal wildlife trade
Gabon
hunting
bushmeat
Issue Date: 16-Feb-2018
Citation: Mambeya MM, Baker F, Momboua BR, Pambo AFK, Hega M, Okouyi VJO, Onanga M, Challender DWS, Ingram DJ, Wang H & Abernethy K (2018) The emergence of a commercial trade in pangolins from Gabon (Forthcoming/Available Online), African Journal of Ecology. https://doi.org/10.1111/aje.12507.
Abstract: Recent seizures of illegally-held wildlife indicate a mounting global trade in pangolins involving all eight species. Seizures of illegally-traded African pangolins are increasing as wild populations of Asian species decline. We investigated trade in pangolins and law enforcement efforts in Gabon; a country likely to have intact wild populations of three of the four species of African pangolin. We compared village sales and trade chains between 2002-3 and 2014. Hunters reported pangolins to be the most frequently requested species in 2014 and the value of pangolins had increased at every point along their trade chain. In Libreville, giant pangolin prices increased 211% and arboreal pangolin prices 73% whilst inflation rose only 4.6% over the same period. We documented a low rate of interception of illegally-traded pangolins despite increased law enforcement. Surveys of potential export routes detected exports across forest borders, in conjunction with ivory, but not through public transport routes. We conclude that whilst there is clear potential and ikelihood that a wild pangolin export trade is emerging from Gabon, traditional bushmeat trade chains may not be the primary supply route. We recommend adjusting conservation policies and actions to impede further development of illegal trade within and from Gabon.
DOI Link: 10.1111/aje.12507
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Village chief interview (Baker 2014).pdfFulltext - Accepted Version; : Interview Template463.77 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 2019-02-16    Request a copy
Foreign worker survey (Baker 2014).pdfFulltext - Accepted Version; : Field Data Information Sheet Template331.05 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 2019-02-16    Request a copy
Accepted Figures- Emerging trade in Pangolins.pdfFulltext - Accepted Version; : Figures338.12 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 2019-02-16    Request a copy
Accepted-The Emergence of a Commercial trade in Pangolins from Gabon.pdfFulltext - Accepted Version; : Article213.02 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 2019-02-16    Request a copy

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