Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26565
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The association between psychological factors and breastfeeding behaviour in women with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30kg/m-2: a systematic review (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Author(s): Lyons, Stephanie
Currie, Sinead
Peters, Sarah
Lavender, Tina
Smith, Debbie
Contact Email: sinead.currie@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Breastfeeding
obesity
psychological factors
women with a BMI ≥30 kg m −2
Issue Date: 24-Mar-2018
Citation: Lyons S, Currie S, Peters S, Lavender T & Smith D (2018) The association between psychological factors and breastfeeding behaviour in women with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30kg/m-2: a systematic review (Forthcoming/Available Online), Obesity Reviews.
Abstract: Breastfeeding can play a key role in the reduction of obesity, but initiation and maintenance rates in women with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥30 kg m−2 are low. Psychological factors influence breastfeeding behaviours in the general population, but their role is not yet understood in women with a BMI ≥30 kg m−2. Therefore, this review aimed to systematically search and synthesize the literature, which has investigated the association between any psychological factor and breastfeeding behaviour in women with a BMI ≥30 kg m−2. The search identified 20 eligible papers, reporting 16 psychological factors. Five psychological factors were associated with breastfeeding behaviours: intentions to breastfeed, belief in breast milk's nutritional adequacy and sufficiency, belief about other's infant feeding preferences, body image and social knowledge. It is therefore recommended that current care should encourage women to plan to breastfeed, provide corrective information for particular beliefs and address their body image and social knowledge. Recommendations for future research include further exploration of several psychological factors (i.e. expecting that breastfeeding will enhance weight loss, depression, anxiety and stress) and evidence and theory‐based intervention development.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/obr.12681
Rights: © 2018 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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