Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26325
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: “You Think You’re Helping Them, But They’re Helping You Too”: Experiences of Scottish Male Young Offenders Participating in a Dog Training Program
Author(s): Leonardi, Rebecca
Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M
McIvor, Gill
Vick, Sarah-Jane
Contact Email: sarah-jane.vick@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: animal-assisted intervention
dog training program
prison
young offenders
dogs
human-animal interaction
Issue Date: 22-Aug-2017
Citation: Leonardi R, Buchanan-Smith HM, McIvor G & Vick S (2017) “You Think You’re Helping Them, But They’re Helping You Too”: Experiences of Scottish Male Young Offenders Participating in a Dog Training Program, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 (8), Art. No.: 945. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14080945.
Abstract: increasingly popular in a range of contexts. Dog training programs (DTPs) are the most popular form of AAI in custodial contexts; prisoners often have multiple needs and DTPs seem to facilitate a diverse range of positive outcomes, including improvements in well-being, behavior, and offending behavior. However, evidence on the efficacy of prison-based DTPs is still limited and these evaluations often lack detail or methodological rigor. We examined the experiences of male young offenders (N = 70) using thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews conducted following completion of a DTP. The themes that emerged indicated a broad range of inter-related experiences and positive outcomes. The most prevalent theme related to their experiences with Dogs (including feelings and attitudes), and there were perceived improvements categorized as: Positive Effects (including mood and well-being), Motivation, Charitable Purpose, Self-Efficacy, Improved Skills, Impulsivity, and Emotional Management. These themes mapped well onto outcomes previously identified in research on DTPs, and to the program’s core aims of improving behavior, educational engagement, employability, and well-being. The diversity and nature of these themes indicates that DTPs have considerable potential to engage and benefit those individuals with multiple needs, such as young offenders, and ultimately to achieve positive long-term outcomes with significant social, health, and economic impact.
DOI Link: 10.3390/ijerph14080945
Rights: © 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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