Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26246
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dc.contributor.authorCaes, Lineen_UK
dc.contributor.authorOrchard, Alexandraen_UK
dc.contributor.authorChristie, Deborahen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-14T01:28:11Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-14T01:28:11Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-05en_UK
dc.identifier.other93en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/26246-
dc.description.abstractPaediatric chronic conditions, e.g. chronic pain and functional gastrointestinal disorders, are commonly diagnosed, with fatigue, pain and abdominal discomfort the most frequently reported symptoms across conditions. Regardless of whether symptoms are connected to an underlying medical diagnosis or not, they are often associated with an increased experience of psychological distress by both the ill child and their parents. While pain and embarrassing symptoms can induce increased distress, evidence is also accumulating in support of a reciprocal relationship between pain and distress. This reciprocal relationship is nicely illustrated in the fear avoidance model of pain, which has recently been found to be applicable to childhood pain experiences. The purpose of this article is to illustrate how mind (i.e. emotions) and body (i.e. physical symptoms) interact using chronic pain and gastrointestinal disorders as key examples. Despite the evidence for the connection between mind and body, the mind-body split is still a dominant position for families and health care systems, as evidenced by the artificial split between physical and mental health care. In a mission to overcome this gap, this article will conclude by providing tools on how the highlighted evidence can help to close this gap between mind and body.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherMDPIen_UK
dc.relationCaes L, Orchard A & Christie D (2017) Connecting the Mind-Body split: Understanding the relationship between symptoms and emotional well-being in Chronic Pain and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. Healthcare, 5 (4), Art. No.: 93. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare5040093en_UK
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectpainen_UK
dc.subjectdistressen_UK
dc.subjectmind-body spliten_UK
dc.titleConnecting the Mind-Body split: Understanding the relationship between symptoms and emotional well-being in Chronic Pain and Functional Gastrointestinal Disordersen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/healthcare5040093en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid29206152en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleHealthcareen_UK
dc.citation.issn2227-9032en_UK
dc.citation.volume5en_UK
dc.citation.issue4en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.author.emailline.caes@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date05/12/2017en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationPsychologyen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trusten_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trusten_UK
dc.identifier.wtid509983en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-7355-0706en_UK
dc.date.accepted2017-11-30en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2017-11-30en_UK
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles

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