Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26042
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Parents who catastrophize about their child's pain prioritize attempts to control pain
Author(s): Caes, Line
Vervoort, Tine
Eccleston, Christopher
Goubert, Liesbet
Contact Email: line.caes@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Aug-2012
Citation: Caes L, Vervoort T, Eccleston C & Goubert L (2012) Parents who catastrophize about their child's pain prioritize attempts to control pain, Pain, 153 (8), pp. 1695-1701.
Abstract: How parents respond to their child in pain is critically important to how both parent and child attempt to cope with pain. We examined the influence of parental catastrophic thinking about child pain on their prioritization for pain control. Using a vignette methodology, parents reported, in response to different pain scenarios, on their imagined motivation for 2 competing goals: to control their child's pain (ie, pain control) or to encourage their child's participation in daily activities (ie, activity engagement). The effects of parent gender, pain intensity, and duration on parental goal priority were also explored. Findings indicated that higher levels of parental catastrophic thoughts were associated with the parents prioritizing child pain control over activity engagement. This effect was significantly moderated by pain duration. Specifically, pain control was more of a priority for those high in catastrophic thinking when the pain was more acute. In contrast, parental catastrophic thoughts had no effect on the pain control strategy favored by parents in situations with longer-lasting pain. Furthermore, independently of parental catastrophic thoughts, heightened priority for pain control was observed in highly intense and chronic pain situations. Moreover, in highly intense pain, priority for pain control was stronger for mothers compared with fathers. Theoretical and clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed. © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2012.04.028
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