Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25912
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dc.contributor.authorParkin, Simonen_UK
dc.contributor.authorAdderley, W Paulen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T00:00:10Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-06T00:00:10Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/25912-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the once ubiquitous vernacular earth-built structures of Scotland and how perceptions of such buildings were shaped and developed through periods of intense cultural and environmental change. We focus upon the past exploitation of traditional resources to construct vernacular architectures and on changes in the perception of the resultant buildings. Historic earth-built structures are today deeply hidden within the landscapes of Scotland, although they were once a common feature of both urban and rural settlements. Whilst the eighteenth and nineteenth century period of Improvement – during which many of these structures were destroyed, repurposed, or left to decay – has received extensive attention by historians, there exists no previous serious study of the human and environmental dimensions. Through analysis of the material aspects of landscape resource use and analysis of the historical perceptions of such use, we emphasize the national significance of this undervalued aspect of Scotland’s built and cultural heritage, increasingly at risk of being lost completely, highlighting the prior ubiquity of mudwall structures.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_UK
dc.relationParkin S & Adderley WP (2017) The Past Ubiquity and Environment of the Lost Earth Buildings of Scotland. Human Ecology, 45 (5), pp. 569-583. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10745-017-9931-4en_UK
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017 This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectEarth-buildingen_UK
dc.subjectTurfen_UK
dc.subjectMudwallen_UK
dc.subjectVernacular architectureen_UK
dc.subjectClimate changeen_UK
dc.subjectScotlanden_UK
dc.subjectBritish Islesen_UK
dc.titleThe Past Ubiquity and Environment of the Lost Earth Buildings of Scotlanden_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10745-017-9931-4en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid29170589en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleHuman Ecologyen_UK
dc.citation.issn1572-9915en_UK
dc.citation.issn0300-7839en_UK
dc.citation.volume45en_UK
dc.citation.issue5en_UK
dc.citation.spage569en_UK
dc.citation.epage583en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderHistoric Scotlanden_UK
dc.author.emailw.p.adderley@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date15/09/2017en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Stirlingen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000415048700002en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85029534579en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid519285en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-5552-1696en_UK
dc.date.accepted2017-08-30en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2017-09-27en_UK
dc.relation.funderprojectEarth Built Structures in Scotlanden_UK
dc.relation.funderrefPO NO.29505en_UK
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