Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25574
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Rosalind Len_UK
dc.contributor.authorHerridge, Elizabeth Jen_UK
dc.contributor.authorNess, Rob Wen_UK
dc.contributor.authorBussiere, Lucen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-15T03:25:11Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-15T03:25:11Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-13en_UK
dc.identifier.othere0178364en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/25574-
dc.description.abstractMaternally inherited bacterial endosymbionts are common in many arthropod species. Some endosymbionts cause female-biased sex ratio distortion in their hosts that can result in profound changes to a host's mating behaviour and reproductive biology. Dance flies (Diptera: Empidinae) are well known for their unusual reproductive biology, including species with female-specific ornamentation and female-biased lek-like swarming behaviour. The cause of the repeated evolution of female ornaments in these flies remains unknown, but is probably associated with female-biased sex ratios in individual species. In this study we assessed whether dance flies harbour sex ratio distorting endosymbionts that might have driven these mating system evolutionary changes. We measured the incidence and prevalence of infection by three endosymbionts that are known to cause female-biased sex ratios in other insect hosts (Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Spiroplasma) across 20 species of dance flies. We found evidence of widespread infection by all three symbionts and variation in sex-specific prevalence across the taxa sampled. However, there was no relationship between infection prevalence and adult sex ratio measures and no evidence that female ornaments are associated with high prevalences of sex-biased symbiont infections. We conclude that the current distribution of endosymbiont infections is unlikely to explain the diversity in mating systems among dance fly species. ©2017 Murray et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_UK
dc.relationMurray RL, Herridge EJ, Ness RW & Bussiere L (2017) Are sex ratio distorting endosymbionts responsible for mating system variation among dance flies (Diptera: Empidinae)?. PLoS ONE, 12 (6), Art. No.: e0178364. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0178364en_UK
dc.rights© 2017 Murray et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_UK
dc.titleAre sex ratio distorting endosymbionts responsible for mating system variation among dance flies (Diptera: Empidinae)?en_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0178364en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid28609446en_UK
dc.citation.jtitlePLoS ONEen_UK
dc.citation.issn1932-6203en_UK
dc.citation.volume12en_UK
dc.citation.issue6en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.citation.date13/06/2017en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Torontoen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBiological and Environmental Sciencesen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000403274700007en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85020719434en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid524998en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-0348-4605en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-8937-8381en_UK
dc.date.accepted2017-05-11en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2017-07-05en_UK
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
journal.pone.0178364.pdfFulltext - Published Version1.3 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright



A file in this item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.