Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2527
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dc.contributor.authorMurakami, Wood David-
dc.contributor.authorWebster, C William R-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-21T00:20:43Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/2527-
dc.description.abstractThis article argues that surveillance is becoming increasingly normalised across Europe and that this is altering the landscape of liberty and security. It identifies this normalisation as a product of the globalisation of surveillance, the domestication of security, the desire of the European Union (EU) to create a distinct leading role in security, and the influence of the 'bad example' of the United Kingdom (UK). The article uses the two very different examples of video-surveillance and electronic public services in the UK to make this case and to argue for both stronger resistance to calls to make human rights more flexible in a risk and security-driven age and more detailed research into the differences between emerging surveillance societies in Europe.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherUniversity Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES)-
dc.relationMurakami Wood D & Webster CWR (2009) Living in surveillance societies: The normalisation of surveillance in Europe and the threat of Britain’s bad example, Journal of Contemporary European Research, 5 (2), pp. 259-273.-
dc.rightsThe publisher has not responded to our queries therefore this work cannot be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.; Published in Journal of Contemporary European Research by University Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES).; Open Access. Publisher statement: "This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. FREE registration is required to access all sections of the journal". http://www.jcer.net/ojs/index.php/jcer/about/editorialPolicies#openAccessPolicy-
dc.subjectCCTVen_UK
dc.subjectSecurityen_UK
dc.subjectSurveillanceen_UK
dc.subjectSurveillance Societyen_UK
dc.subject.lcshElectronic surveillance Social aspects-
dc.subject.lcshComputers and civilization-
dc.subject.lcshInformation technology Social aspects-
dc.titleLiving in surveillance societies: The normalisation of surveillance in Europe and the threat of Britain’s bad exampleen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher has not responded to our queries. This work cannot be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.citation.jtitleJournal of Contemporary European Research-
dc.citation.issn1815-347X-
dc.citation.volume5-
dc.citation.issue2-
dc.citation.spage259-
dc.citation.epage273-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.jcer.net/index.php/jcer/article/view/159-
dc.author.emailcwrw1@stir.ac.uk-
dc.contributor.affiliationQueen’s University, Canada-
dc.contributor.affiliationSocio-Management-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation Journal Articles

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