Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24875
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dc.contributor.advisorDelaney, Liam-
dc.contributor.advisorDaly, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorEgan, Mark-
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-31T10:41:51Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-31T10:41:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-15-
dc.identifier.citationDaly, M., Delaney, L., Egan, M., & Baumeister, R. (2015). Childhood self-control and unemployment throughout the life span: Evidence from two British cohort studies. Psychological Science, 26, 709-723. doi:10.1177/0956797615569001en_GB
dc.identifier.citationEgan, M., Daly, M., Delaney, L., Boyce, C., & Wood, A. (2016). Adolescent conscientiousness predicts lower lifetime unemployment. Journal of Applied Psychologyen_GB
dc.identifier.citationEgan, M., Daly, M., & Delaney, L. (2015). Childhood psychological distress and youth unemployment: Evidence from two British cohort studies. Social Science & Medicine, 124, 11-17. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.11.023en_GB
dc.identifier.citationEgan, M., Daly, M., & Delaney, L. (2016). Adolescent psychological distress, unemployment, and the Great Recession: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997. Social Science & Medicine, 156, 98-105. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.03.013en_GB
dc.identifier.citationEgan, M., Daly, M., & Delaney, L. (forthcoming). Childhood psychological predictors of lifelong economic outcomes. In R. Ranyard (Ed.), Economic Psychology: The Science of Economic Mental Life and Behaviour. Wiley/Blackwell.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/24875-
dc.description.abstractRecent research in economics and psychology has examined the childhood noncognitive skills which predict future economic success. However, there has been relatively little research on whether these skills predict future unemployment. This thesis uses data from four cohort studies (total N = 47,328) from Great Britain and the United States to examine how lifetime trajectories of unemployment are affected by childhood differences in self-control (chapter 3), conscientiousness (4), and mental health (5-6). These are some of the first studies to examine how pre-labor market measures of these psychological characteristics prospectively predict future unemployment. Chapters 3, 5 and 6 are the first studies to examine how early psychological characteristics interact with recessions to produce differential unemployment outcomes. After adjusting for cognitive ability and key sociodemographic indicators (e.g. gender, SES), all three of these psychological characteristics are found to predict future unemployment. The effects are statistically significant and economically meaningful, comparable in magnitude to the effects of intelligence. Chapter 3 shows that childhood with poor self-control were disproportionately more likely than their more self-controlled peers to become unemployed during the 1980s UK recession, and chapters 5 and 6 find a similar effect for children with high psychological distress compared to their less distressed peers during the 1980s UK recession and 2007 US recession. These studies demonstrate the value of using psychological research to examine economic outcomes. The chief policy implication is that interventions which improve childhood levels of self-control, conscientiousness and mental health may be an effective way to reduce future population unemployment levels. In the short term, remediation programs which take into account individual psychological differences may improve the efficacy of unemployment interventions, particularly during recessions when certain groups are more likely than others to become unemployed.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherUniversity of Stirlingen_GB
dc.rightsChapters 3, 4, 5 and 6 have been published or accepted for publication during the period of the PhD registration. Copyright of these papers resides with the publishers, but under the terms of the copyright they have been reproduced as chapters in this thesis.en_GB
dc.rightsChapter 3: Daly, M., Delaney, L., Egan, M., & Baumeister, R. (2015). Childhood self-control and unemployment throughout the life span: Evidence from two British cohort studies. Psychological Science, 26, 709-723. doi:10.1177/095679761556900. SAGE allow the use of the article in a book written or edited by the author.en_GB
dc.rightsChapter 4: Egan, M., Daly, M., Delaney, L., Boyce, C., & Wood, A. (accepted for publication). Adolescent conscientiousness predicts lower lifetime unemployment. Journal of Applied Psychology. The copyright of this article is owned by the American Psychological Association. This article may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.en_GB
dc.rightsChapter 5: Egan, M., Daly, M., & Delaney, L. (2015). Childhood psychological distress and youth unemployment: Evidence from two British cohort studies. Social Science & Medicine, 124, 11-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.11.023. Elsevier have the following policy: Theses and dissertations which contain embedded PJAs as part of the formal submission can be posted publicly by the awarding institution with DOI links back to the formal publications on ScienceDirecten_GB
dc.rightsChapter 6: Egan, M., Daly, M., & Delaney, L. (2016). Adolescent psychological distress, unemployment, and the Great Recession: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997. Social Science & Medicine, 156, 98-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.03.013. Elsevier have the following policy: Theses and dissertations which contain embedded PJAs as part of the formal submission can be posted publicly by the awarding institution with DOI links back to the formal publications on ScienceDirecten_GB
dc.subjectunemploymenten_GB
dc.subjectcohort studiesen_GB
dc.subjectlongitudinal studiesen_GB
dc.subjectbig five personalityen_GB
dc.subjectself controlen_GB
dc.subjectintelligenceen_GB
dc.subjectmental healthen_GB
dc.subject.lcshLearning Congressesen_GB
dc.subject.lcshLearning, psychology ofen_GB
dc.subject.lcshDevelopmental psychology Social aspectsen_GB
dc.subject.lcshUnemploymenten_GB
dc.titleChildhood psychological predictors of unemployment: Evidence from four cohort studiesen_GB
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_GB
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophyen_GB
dc.contributor.funderI gratefully acknowledge funding support from the Economic and Social Research Council and Skills Development Scotlanden_GB
dc.author.emailmark.egan@stir.ac.uken_GB
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